How Is Macbeth A Tragic Hero

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The great Aristotle, created the term ‘tragic hero’, defining exemplary characters like Hamlet, Oipedus the King, and my personal favorite, Macbeth. The term, simply means, a character with the qualities of noble, and high-standing, but has flaws eventually leads to a tragedy. Macbeth is like any other human, with morals, goals, and of course, bad human qualities. William Shakespeare conveys Macbeth as tragic hero when he is represented as noble, brave soldier, but falls to the manipulation of his wife and the witches, making ambition and over confidence his tragic flaws. The play introduces the great Macbeth, a soldier, loyal to his king, King Duncan, who names Macbeth Thane of Cawdor. In the beginning after the war has ended, the captain…show more content…
When he informed her about the prophecies in a letter, she says that he does not lack the motivation, but the mean side that he needs to do what needs to be done. So, aside, she tells him to hurry, so she can tell him what he needs to hear, which shows the reader that Lady Macbeth herself is already loving the idea herself. Just after, before even Macbeth arrives, she says, “The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan” (Shakespeare, I, V, 28-30). She already believes she, or someone, has to murder King Duncan, showing intense ambition, that then ends up manipulating Macbeth, making this another tragic flaw. Right before the planned murder of King Duncan, Lady Macbeth tells him that she herself cannot murder him, for he reminds of her of her father, convincing Macbeth to kill him by saying, “When you durst do it, then you were a man; And to be more than what you were, you would, Be so much more the man” (Shakespeare, I, VII, 49-51). She is trying to tell him to not be coward, and just carry on with the deed he was so convinced he was going to do earlier. So, he kills King Duncan, showing is he has fallen to the manipulation of his wife. However, Shakespeare shows us that Macbeth regrets what he has done, and he loses it, making him human once more. After he kills Duncan, he sees the bloody daggers, and the ghost of Duncan at the dinner…show more content…
He was never a killer, not a cold-blooded murderer. The author, Lanis, further explains “Macbeth 's ambition violates fundamental rules of conduct in a nation slipping into a brutal contest of power, clinging to a semblance of moral order” (Langis). As if the initial manipulation of the witches’ was not enough, they appear once again to tell him about three specific apparitions, which make him dangerously over confident, his last tragic flaw. The first apparition tells him beware Macduff, the second one assures no man born of a woman will harm him, and lastly, the third one promises him that he will be king as long as the wood never move toward his castle. All these apparitions make him too confident, believing he will not have a problem. Mr. Schoenbaum, also believes sim as he further explains, “these prophecies enkindle in him, false certainty that he can eliminate limitations, restrictions, and ultimately the threat of his own mortality” (Schoenbaum). However, this confidence, the last tragic flaw leads to demise. He believed the trees would never move, but did not count that Malcolm had his men camouflage to look like trees. Furthermore, Macbeth knew that every living man, was born of woman, so he was unstoppable. However, right before his death, Macduff revealed he was taken out of mother’s womb, so technically,
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