How Does Pecola Contribute To The Insanity In The Bluest Eye

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Traveling Toward Internal Dusk; Pecola’s Gradual Decline Into Insanity In Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, Pecola Breedlove is a young girl trying to find herself. Throughout the novel, as Pecola grows as a young girl her confidence is tainted by her experiences and the world around her. Pecola lives in Lorain, Ohio, in the 1940s. During this time, role models for young girls were predominantly Caucasian, blonde, blue-eyed women. This impacted young girls like Pecola who had no role models to look up to. Pecola not only has no role models, but also an unsupportive family. Pecola’s family is known for their ugliness and argue with each other often. The people in the Breedlove’s community reject them and disapprove of Pecola, some even shunning…show more content…
Pecola Breedlove’s broken and abusive family is detrimental to her mental stability and well being. From the moment Pecola is born her mother Pauline immediately distinguishes her as ugly. Pauline recalls he first thought after Pecola’s birth as “Lord she was ugly” (Morrison 126). The Breedloves wore their “cloak of ugliness” and “accepted it without question” (39). The Breedloves acknowledge their appearance define them and outline who they are. This family’s trait of ugliness has a negative impact on Pecola’s upbringing. Pecola was raised to believe she was ugly, and developed ideas that her ugliness caused problems even with other people. Pecola once even debates that her ugliness is the reason for her broken family. Pecola’s mother neglects her during the novel and instead idolizes the family she works for, the Fishers. One day, while Pecola, Freida, and Claudia visit Pauline at the Fisher’s home, the Fisher’s daughter encounters the girls. When the Fisher’s daughter sees the three girls, “fear danced around her face for a second” (108). She becomes anxious and panics…show more content…
The first occurrence of Pecola’s unjust treatment was by a group of local boys bullying her in the park. The boys bully Pecola for her dark skin and for her father’s actions, two things which she had no control over. Pecola felt demeaned and victimized. Though she had truly nothing wrong she was harassed because of her race. Pecola did not fight back against the boys, showing that she has no courage and self-assurance to stand up for herself. Shortly after this incident, Pecola meets Maureen Peel. Maureen is a character the other girls envy, as she was “as the richest of white girls” and “swaddled in comfort and care” (62). Maureen protects Pecola from the boys and at first is friendly to her. However when the topic of sexuality rises, Pecola is offended and Frieda and Claudia defend her. Maureen feels threatened, and offends the girls by calling them “black” as an insult (73). The three girls are insulted by being referred to as their own race. Maureen then mocks their looks by saying “I am cute. And you ugly! Black and ugly” (73). Claudia then attempts to hit Maureen, but hits Pecola instead. Pecola is constantly in situations where she is the victim although she is never at fault. Later, Pecola feels this discrimination again when lured into the house of Geraldine and her son Junior. Junior kills his mother’s beloved cat, and blames it on Pecola. Geraldine
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