How Did The Plessy V. Ferguson Case

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Separate but not Equal Through the duration of time, segregation has played a consequential role in history. The color of a person’s skin has been a deciding factor on the amount of respect they receive, the level of their education, where they participate in certain activities, and the quality of their job. This has not only been evident in earlier times, but in current times as well. The struggle to achieve equality was made even more difficult by the legislation of racism in the Plessy v. Ferguson case. In the 1950s, after the dispersion of the Reconstruction era, the Jim Crow laws were created. A Jim Crow law was any law that enforced racial segregation in the South. Part of…show more content…
In June of 1892, Homer Plessy, an African-American train passenger, refused to sit in a Jim Crow car, which was a car reserved for blacks only. Though Plessy was only one-eighth African-American, he was still considered black, which was unacceptable to the society. At this time, Plessy sitting in a white compartment was a violation of the Louisiana law. Typically, passengers who sat in an inapplicable area were required to pay a $25 fine, or would face a 20-day jail sentence. Plessy believed that his constitutional rights had been infringed, which induced the Plessy v. Ferguson case. “Plessy v. Ferguson is considered an important case because it established the doctrine of separate but equal that allowed states for the first time to legally segregate the races,” states historian Yahuru Williams. To be separate but equal meant that both races were provided equal rights, as long as the races were divided into distinct facilities. On May 18 1896, the U.S. Supreme Court voted, by a seven to one majority, in favor of the judge to advance the doctrine of “separate but equal.” The doctrine became the standard for all ordinances regarding segregation. The Jim Crow laws were used to promote segregation and racist behavior. In…show more content…
Responding to federal demands, the district had made major changes to the school system over the years, Jacks said. One measure involved the establishment of neighborhood schools that allowed students to pick which school they wanted to attend.” In the end, the federal court’s main focus was to give the youth of Cleveland the same level of education. As said by the U.S. Supreme Court “We conclude that, in the field of public education, the doctrine of ‘separate but equal’ has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.” In conclusion, it was clear that the struggle to achieve equality was made difficult by the legislation of racism in the Plessy v. Ferguson case. Society was substantially affected by the “separate but equal” doctrine, which promoted racist actions and behavior in early and current times. Segregation has been slowly improving through the years, and continues to improve, as some schools are still desegregating today. African-Americans will never be able to experience equal rights if they are separate from the rest of society. It has proved to be more effectual for everyone to be together, as well as having equal
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