How Did Literature Change In American Literature

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From the very beginning of creating America as a country, American literature was formed from writing letters with different languages to describe the new land and nation until writers wrote novels, poems, sermons, and narratives. By the mid - nineteen century, American literature stepped into a new realm, and many different ideas including economic, religious and political reforms caused big changes in American literature, which affected American society as well. There were many far-famed abolitionist writers in American society that wrote different passages about slavery, and they fought against slavery in their writings. These writers described the condition of African American slaves in the plantation region and made narratives of fugitive…show more content…
She describes the conversation between John and his wife Mary in the novel of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” how religion opposes to the act of slavery. Stowe points out Mary’s words that say, “ I do not know anything about politics, but I can read my Bible; and there I see that I must feed the hungry, clothe the naked, and comfort the desolate; and that Bible I mean to follow” (829). She tries to convince readers that the act of the slavery is a mistake, and implementing such a law politically is against the Bible and their religious belief. She knew that Christianity has a great position among the American people and has a significant effect on each individual’s life. Therefore, obeying the law of the Christian means to oppose the political law and defense the fugitive…show more content…
In contrast to Stowe, Douglass was an African-American slave man; he himself experienced the slavery from his childhood and was familiar with the pains and sufferings of his fellow men. His first narrative after his freedom was “The Narrative Life of Fredrick Douglass,” which was one of the most famous and influential narratives in American literature. In his narrative, he portrays himself as a hero, who had the ability to read and write that inspired him to his slave life effort to be a free man. As Winifred Morgan points out, “Even as a young child, Douglass realized that the knowledge represented power. Words provide access to the power of communication, and the route to long-term control of the message is through literacy.” That implies, the knowledge helps him get to understand the meaning of the life better and makes his mind think how his life is being wasted by some plantation owners to get the benefit without any
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