History Of Pain Theory

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“The greatest evil is physical pain.” Saint Augustine understood that experiencing pain is horrific, and most would agree. However, it is perhaps emotional pain, rather than physical, that causes the most damage. Whether physical or emotional, painful experiences are upsetting at best, and in severe cases, they can be life-changing. Pain is a feeling of distress that is often an underlying problem or symptom of an illness. History of Pain Theory Pain theory is so far integrated into our history that it dates back to the ancient Greeks. The definition of pain theory is humans giving an explanation for reasons that we may feel pain. Other definitions may include; “physical suffering or discomfort caused by illness or injury, careful effort;…show more content…
In the eleventh century.some philosophers thought that there were more senses than just the five that humans currently have. Plato thought that pain was like an emotion that existed inside the human brain. Scholarly mparticles from the Renaissance reveal a significant understanding about the nature of pain. Before the scientific Renaissance in Europe, pain was not well understood and it was theorized that pain existed outside of the body. An example would be, as a punishment from God, with the only treatment being prayer.(Meldrum) Pain was also theorized to exist as a test or trial on a person. Pain was inflicted by God onto person to reaffirm their faith, or in the example of Jesus, to lend legitimacy and purpose to a trial through suffering. Rene Descartes was an important person in the role of theorizing…show more content…
These patterns occur only with intense stimulation. Because strong and mild stimuli of the same sense modality produce different patterns of neural activity, being hit hard feels painful, but being caressed does not. It suggested that all cutaneous qualities are produced by spatial and temporal patterns of nerve impulses rather than by separate, modality specific transmission routes. Gate control theory of pain states that stimulation by non-noxious input is able to nullify pain. The gate control theory of pain states that non-painful input closes the "gates" to painful input, which prevents pain sensation from traveling to the central nervous system. Stimulation by non-noxious input is able to suppress pain (Melzack). The gate control theory of pain asserts that non-painful input closes the "gates" to painful input, which prevents pain sensation from traveling to the central nervous system. The human brain is the key component in the sensation of pain. Types of

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