History Of Bobbies

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1. Bobbies - The term bobbies is defined by the Criminal Justice Today textbook as the popular British name given to members of Sir Robert (Bob) Peel 's Metropolitan Police Service" (Schmalleger 139). A bobby is also known as a constable, which is an official of a Municipal Corporation whose primary duties are to protect and preserve the peace of the community. Additionally, London 's bobbies were organized around two principles, which are; the belief that it was possible to discourage crime, and the practice of preventive patrol. The Britannica Encyclopedia website states, "The London police force was created in 1829 by an act introduced in Parliament by the home secretary, Sir Robert Peel (hence the nicknames "bobbies" and "peelers" for policemen).…show more content…
[this type of police force is also known to] wear a uniform that is nonmilitary in appearance" (Britannica.com). An example of a bobby would be a British police officer, carrying a short, wooden truncheon, which they would only use in self defense or to restore order, and wearing a uniform that is nonmilitary in appearance, in order to preserve peace and prevent crimes. 2. Kansas City Experiments - This term is defined by the textbook as "The first large-scale scientific study of law enforcement practices. Sponsored by the Police Foundation, it focused on the practice of preventive patrol" (Schmalleger 143). It is known as the most famous application of social research principles to police management was published in 1974. In the study, the southern part of Kansas city was…show more content…
Vigilantism - The term vigilantism is defined by the textbook as "the act of taking the law into one 's own hands" (Schmalleger 140). Although today this term has a negative connotation, most of the original vigilantes of the American West were honest men and women trying to forge an organized and predictable lifestyle out of the challenging situation which they encountered. Furthermore, vigilantes, who often times faced unscrupulous, money-hungry desperadoes, did what they could in order to bring the standards of civilization, as they understood them to bear in their communities. The idea of "vigilante justice" is often rationalized by the idea that adequate legal mechanisms for criminal punishment are either nonexistent, insufficient, or inefficient. Additionally, vigilantes typically see the government as ineffective in enforcing the law and often claim to justify their actions as a fulfillment of the wishes of the community. As defined by the legal-dictionary.com website, vigilantism is referred to as "Taking the law into one 's own hands and attempting to effect justice according to one 's own understanding of right and wrong; action taken by a voluntary association of persons who organize themselves for the purpose of protecting a common interest, such as liberty, property, or personal security..." (thefreedictionary.com). An example of vigilantism would be George Zimmerman, who decided to take law into his own hands by profiling someone as a criminal and shooting
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