Hirschi's Theory Of Control Theory

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Control Theories: History & Application in Today’s Society In the world of sociology, various theories have been created in which researchers brought to light to describe the ways in which society is comprised, and to help elaborate on individual and group behaviors. These theories are also used to speculate why deviance, or actions that do not obey the social norms of groups, occur and what forms of management can be used to eliminate or work around these forms of socially constructed imperfections. (Downes, Rock, & McCormick., 2013). Most sociological theories, in looking at deviant behavior, infer toward various types of socio-cultural reasoning and the lack of ability for an individual to succeed in conforming to social norms. Control theories,…show more content…
(Downes, et al., 2013). Therefore, unlike the beliefs of Ivan Nye, he focused his theory more closely on the relations of the individual with others. He identified four basic components that formulate the social bond. The first, attachment states that it is important for an individual to feel as though they have connections with one another in society and that if they don’t, it inevitably will lead to deviant behavior. Commitment, the second element, specifies that if an individual has a life that is meaningful and take part in social activities that make a difference, they are less likely to take part in deviant behaviors. The third element, involvement, claims that if a person is involved in conventional activities, that they gain a stronger bond with others and therefore, they have more of a reason to stay tied with social norms. Belief, the last element, asserts that if a person feels that the rules are virtuous of nature and fear the repercussions of violating these laws, they are less likely to believe it is in their best interest to keep in line with the social norms. (Lefebvre, 2016). Much of society today has formulated strong bonds within the community and with one another. Deviance committed is mainly by individuals who highly lack in all four of these components. A strong…show more content…
In their theory, they hypothesized that individual choice should be the main focus of deviation. Cohen and Felson asserted that in order for a person to feel motivated to commit a crime they would need to encounter an opportunity to evade a figure of authority, as well as pinpointing an appropriate victim. (Lefebvre,
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