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Health: Heart Disease

comparative Essay
1399 words
1399 words
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How much does my heart rate change after running in place for 10 minutes? Introduction The leading cause of death in the US is heart disease and the fourth leading cause of death in the US is stroke. Both are related to the heart. Both can be prevented (or at least somewhat alleviated) by engaging in exercise. Among the other leading causes of death is diabetes, which is related to being obese (and therefore sedentary). Exercise can reduce the chance of becoming diabetic and is also important in managing diabetes. In fact, 250,000 deaths in the US can be credited to leading an exercise-free lifestyle. Less than 1/3 of adults actually do enough physical activity. Heart rate is the amount of times the heart beats per minute. The heart beats every time the muscle contracts in order to pump oxygen through the medium of blood throughout the body. When you exercise, your muscles need more oxygen in order to undergo cellular respiration for energy. Therefore, during exercise the heart must contract more often for the muscles to receive sufficient oxygen. However, how much faster is related to the fitness level of each individual and the intensity of the exercise. Therefore, understanding how a physical activity, such as running in place for 10 minutes, affects heart rate can help us understand cardiovascular health and possibly preventing cardiovascular diseases. Research and Current Ideas Resting heart rate is the amount of times a heart beats per minute (bpm) when the individual is sitting or lying down without having previously engaged in intense of physical activity. In other words, the resting heart rate is taken when the heart is working the minimum so at the very least the individual remains alive. Stress can ca... ... middle of paper ... ...lar-system/exercise-and-the-heart/effect-of-exercise-on-the-heart/.ac N.a. (2013, June 17). Exercise’s Effects on the Heart. New York Times. Retrieved on Mar. 22, 2014, from http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/specialtopic/physical-activity/exercise's-effects-on-the-heart.html. Myers, Jonathon. (2003, Jan. 7). Exercise and Cardiovascular Health. AHA Journals, vol. 107, Issue 1, e2-e5. Retrieved on Mar. 22, 2014 from http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/107/1/e2.full. Robinson, Erica L. (2013). How Does Exercise Affect Your Heart? Active. Retrieved on Mar. 22, 2014, from http://www.active.com/fitness/articles/how-does-exercise-affect-your-heart. Toscano, Joeseph. (2003, Mar. 11). Cardiac Enlargement: A Patient Guide. HealthCentral. Retrieved on Mar. 22, 2014 from http://www.healthcentral.com/heart-disease/patient-guide-44614-6.html.

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that if they run in place for 10 minutes, their heart rate will go up by 50% on average.
  • Recommends plugging the labquest mini usb cable into the usb port on the side of the computer.
  • Recommends holding the wireless heart rate monitor with a hand on each hand-grip. the white arrow should be facing up and pointed towards the computer.
  • Advises that the white arrow on the labquest mini extension should be facing the same way as the heart rate monitor.
  • Recommends having another person click the green collect button at the top of the screen. data may not be collected for up to 20 seconds.
  • Explains that the top graph is your "heart rate as a vital sign" graph. if the x-axis and y-axes don't go up to 150, right-click on white space on the graph and skip to step 13.
  • Explains that in the pop-up menu choose graph options, and then switch to the axes options tab.
  • Explains that where it says top, type in 150, and where the text says right, enter 150.
  • Recommends selecting the graph by clicking on it and pressing ctrl+c on the keyboard to copy.
  • Explains that the bottom graph is your "heart beat" graph. click to make sure it is selected, then press ctrl+c to copy.
  • Explains that on the left in the table are the actual numbers of your heart rate at particular times. input this data into a separate table.
  • Recommends running in place for 10 minutes with all the zeal you can muster. time yourself using the timer.
  • Recommends repeating steps 5-9 to get your post-physical activity heart rate.
  • Explains that their average resting heart rate was 69.77 bpm, and average post-physical activity heartrate of 98.04, resulting in an average increase of 40.52%.
  • Concludes that their hypothesis was not supported by the experiment because their resting heart rate only went up by 40.52%.
  • Explains that they hypothesized that their heart rate would go up by 50% on average, though 40.52% is only 9.48% away from 50%.
  • Explains that heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of death in the us. exercise can reduce the chance of becoming diabetic and manage diabetes.
  • Explains resting heart rate is the amount of times a heart beats per minute (bpm) when the individual is sitting or lying down without having previously engaged in intense physical activity.
  • Cites n.a., myers, jonathon, and toscano, joeseph.
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