Hashem Is Truly Everywhere Analysis

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Hashem is Truly Everywhere- Revised: In the Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Nick Carraway is introduced to the wild, careless world of the rich and left devastated in the aftermath of Gatsby’s death. He watches as Gatsby, Jordan, Daisy and Tom do whatever they want and ignore the consequences. Religion has no place in this world, in fact, it’s notable for it’s absence. The characters live unethical lives; they drink, party, cheat, and even murder. Yet, there is a sense that throughout the whole book, someone or thing is always watching and is aware of their sins. When tragedy occurs in the end, the characters finally seek solace in religion. Despite the fact that the characters in The Great Gatsby live their lives immorally, a God-like…show more content…
Church is nothing more to them than a place nearby where bells ring every hour, and God is little more than an exclamation. In fact, one of the only mentions of religion early on in the book is when Catherine explains why Myrtle and Tom cannot be together. She says, "You see," cried Catherine triumphantly. She lowered her voice again. "It’s really his wife that 's keeping them apart. She 's a Catholic, and they don 't believe in divorce," (37). Nick then explains that, “Daisy was not a Catholic, and I was a little shocked at the elaborateness of the lie,” (37). Religion has no significance to the characters’ moral lives. It’s just an explanation to be used for any behavior - whenever it suits them. It’s ironic really, since instead of having a divorce, Tom has an affair--all in the name of…show more content…
In attempting to comfort Mr. Wilson about Myrtle’s death, Michaelis tells him that, “You ought to have a church, George, for times like this,” (168). When devastating events beyond human control occur, people need a place to mourn and to feel as if there is something there for them. They require the solace that cannot be provided by any other human. It is a solace that can only be found in God, the idea of an all-powerful being and a heaven; a “better place” for those who have passed on. This idea of religion is also found in regards to Gatsby’s death. When Nick goes to visit Mr. Wolfsheim, he hears Mr. Wolfsheim singing “The Rosary,” a popular Catholic song from the time. Nick describes, “Someone had begun to whistle ‘The Rosary,’ tunelessly, inside,” (181). “The Rosary,” describes counting the precious moments with a loved one and how those moments are holy in a way. Only after a death does one learn that the things that had just felt ordinary were in reality holy. Regret is stronger than gratitude however, and it is often too late that people realize this. Also, Nick calls for a minister to come to Gatsby’s funeral, even though Gatsby did not appear to be religious while alive, and Nick does not seem to particularly observant either. The book says, “A little before three the Lutheran minister arrived from Flushing,” (185). This shows how Nick turns to religion after Gatsby’s death.
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