Happiness And Happiness In Huck Finn By Mark Twain

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Society gives out travesty on how wealth correlates with success and happiness, which forces individuals to accomplish foolish and malevolent acts in order to gain a dissolution of happiness in wealth. During Huck Finn’s journey, he meets two hooligans who call themselves the Duke and the King; the Duke and the King lie to and steal from innocent villagers and “played this town for all they’re worth” in order to achieve monetary value (Twain 188). Without excessive wealth, individuals believe they do not have any value in the world. Once people would reach their goal of making a particular amount of money, and they would then strive for more. However, individuals’ means to reach their monetary goals would refer to malevolent actions, including…show more content…
Individuals would rival each other on the premise of the standards set by society, such as grades, appearances, wealth, or even popularity. Unable to see how society defines success in a way which individuals stay in an endless void of achieving further unnecessary and materialistic objects, individuals would never truly have satisfaction with the amount of the disillusion of success they achieve. Thereby, society prevents individuals from reaching their true happiness, success, and potential. To extend Mark Twain’s argument of the foolish acts, Critic Larzer Ziff establishes how the “unhealthy and unnatural competition,” resulting from social standards would also harm the civilization: “... those with the worst and most dangerous qualities rise to the top” (Ziff 208). From their influences towards individuals, society steers them to harm and to compete against one another in order to gain a temporary happiness, thus sees an increase in the numbers of detrimental individuals in a civilization, and, inevitably, the civilization will eventually collapse as…show more content…
When Huck Finn returns to civilization after some time in nature, he eagerly awaits his upcoming adventures in other areas of nature due to the contrasting differences between the relationships of individuals within civilization and the relationships of individuals within nature: “But I reckon I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because aunt Sally she’s going to adopt me and sivilize me and I can’t stand it” (Twain 296). Due to the expectations of civilize elites in society, individuals who do not apply traditional manners would fall inferior to those who do. To display how nature does not have the standards and expectations as society does, Mark Twain highlights the enthusiasm of individuals towards nature. In order to fully accomplish stability, nature utilizes all aspects of itself and sees the importance and values of each individual; nature values individuals not by ascribe statuses, but by the individual’s overall contributions to the stability of its system. Nature does not enforce supremacy; for example, the river aspects of nature, although changes the routes and land, would not exist if not for the weather and rain clouds filling the banks. The atmosphere gives the river depth and life, however, it would not function if not for the mountains and oceans; the mountains would not become great, if not for the river that shapes their existence. Not
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