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Hammurabi DBQ

opinionated Essay
449 words
449 words
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The Dishonorable Code of Hammurabi Justice cannot be decided by a lone individual, with or without the “approval of the gods”. Nearly 4,000 years ago, Hammurabi gradually came to power over much of Mesopotamia over a span of about 30 years. During the last 12 years of his rule, Hammurabi introduced his infamous Hammurabi Code. It is often debated about how fair these rules truly were. If the word just means to be fair, can it be said that Hammurabi's Code was just? The answer is simple. The Code of Hammurabi was entirely unjust die to covering up the nature of his laws under the guise of “protecting the weak”, his highly unfair stance on injury to both self and family, and overly harsh punishments. Hammurabi justifies his laws by claiming that they have come from the gods (doc. A)- particularly the god Shamash, who is the great god and judge of heaven and Earth. (doc. B) Hammurabi constantly warrants his actions by explaining that he is “helping” everyone with laws that have godly blessings. To further his point, Hammurabi carved all of his laws into large pillar structures called “Steele”. (doc A) Despite these claims of support from Shamash (even stone carvings of this), His laws were anything but virtuous. …show more content…

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that the dishonorable code of hammurabi was unjust to cover up the nature of his laws under the guise of "protecting the weak" and overly harsh punishments.
  • Analyzes how hammurabi justified his laws by claiming that they have come from the gods, especially the great god shamash, who is the judge of heaven and earth.
  • Opines that if one's idea of protection is doing nothing for the victims and inflicting cruel punishments, it is not just.
  • Opines that hammurabi cannot be just in his laws if he gives excessive or harsh punishments for basic offenses.

Despite stating that “the strong may not injure the weak” (doc. B), a boy may have their hands cut off for hitting their father, or if a woman with child is hit and their unborn child dies, the attacker only needs to pay her father (if she is free) or her owner (if she is not free) between 10 to as low as 2 shekels of silver depending on how much she is “worth” (doc E). If one's idea of protection is doing nothing for the victims and inflicting cruel punishments, then it is not

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