Hamlet: The Modern Day Tragedy

993 Words4 Pages
In modern day society, nothing is as valuable as it was once believed. Respect is now a figment of the imagination and other values and morals that were once instilled in all are slowly starting to be corrupted or either vanished. Some things society considers acceptable now was heavily frowned upon in the past. In Hamlet, William Shakespeare displays a tragedy and its effects through complex dialogue of Hamlet, which can directly be associated with similar events we experience today. Hamlet’s tragedy is reflected everyday in various forms. Reality TV has made life’s events a skeptical for everyday enjoyment. Modern day shows like “The Maury Provich Show” highlight demoralizing actions and publicize them for compensation. Negative actions such as betrayal, incest, and revenge are being broadcast through cable television everyday for watchers at home. These same events are what Shakespeare cleverly developed into the fuel for Hamlet’s anger, and the reason for his quest for revenge. Shakespeare’s method of storytelling leads readers to believe he is a man before his time. The episodes Hamlet encounters show that Shakespeare seems to have an insight on the precise nature of those who would experience similar circumstances today. In fact, one can infer that Hamlet’s reactions could be described as human nature. According to Michael Cameron Andrews, “Hamlet is not an individual at all, but everyman, haunted by the fear of being dead, and burdened by original sin” (Andrews). In present day, when a person experiences situations such as Hamlet, their actions aren’t usually premeditated. Their reactions are usually just acts of confusion, hurt, and other mixed emotions which drive the person to do something that could put both themse... ... middle of paper ... ...zen Harris. Vol. 1. Detroit: Gale Research, 1984. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 25 Jan. 2011. Klein, Holger. "Hamlet: Overview." Reference Guide to English Literature. Ed. D. L. Kirkpatrick. 2nd ed. Chicago: St. James Press, 1991. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 25 Jan. 2011. Showalter, Elaine. "Representing Ophelia: Women, Madness, and the Responsibilities of Feminist Criticism." Shakespeare and the Question of Theory. Ed. Patricia Parker and Geoffrey Hartman. 1985. 77-94. Rpt. in Shakespearean Criticism. Ed. Dana Ramel Barnes. Vol. 35. Detroit: Gale Research, 1997. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 25 Jan. 2011. Skulsky, Harold. "Revenge, Honor, and Conscience in Hamlet." PMLA 85.1 (Jan. 1970): 78-87. Rpt. in Shakespearean Criticism. Ed. Dana Ramel Barnes. Vol. 35. Detroit: Gale Research, 1997. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 25 Jan. 2011.
Open Document