Hamlet And Self In Shakespeare's Hamlet Vs. Self

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Hamlet vs self Hamlet is a play written by William Shakespeare in 1601. The play follows a young prince named Hamlet. Who returns home from school and discovers that his father has died, his uncle has married his mother, and ends up meeting the ghost of his father. The play has been a success since its release, having been performed in a run since its first production. Hamlet’s main enemy in this play is shown as the Uncle, who Hamlet learns from his father’s ghost early on killed his father. Hamlet’s worst enemy according to some scholars, is himself. Hamlet seems to do nothing but get stuck in his head for almost the entire play until he’s finally faced with his own mortality and therefore must act or defy his father’s wishes. When Hamlet…show more content…
Making him King. First of all, there the issue of, “To be, or not to be… ” but as an even more important standard to measure the degree of Hamlet’s concern, there is the issue of his sanity. Publicly, he appears to grow crazier and crazier. Privately, however, he appears to become more and more heartsick and accepting of the death he feared so much in the beginning. Hamlet is speaking to himself at whether being alive or being dead is the better option. To show himself as sane or insane? Throughout the play, the people around him are shown by Hamlet’s actions that he is slowly going insane. Hamlet is stuck in the back and forth between killing Claudius or keep him alive. Hamlet wants to be seen as an honorable man, get rid of this false king, and reclaim justice and have the kingdom remember and mourn his father. Hamlet outright kills his uncle he will be a worse man for…show more content…
When asked about his depressed appearance and demeanor by Gertrude, Hamlet replies, "Seems, madam? Nay, it is. I know not "seems" (1037, line 76). This relates the idea that Hamlet is 'what he appears to be '. Later, he clearly makes a statement about his mental health when he commits himself to avenge his father 's murder. This quote allows the reader to follow Hamlet 's train of thought in regards to his role as student, mourning son, and Prince to the throne: "I 'll wipe away all trivial fond records, All saws of books, all forms, all pressures past That youth and observation copied there, And thy commandment all alone shall live Within the book and volume of my brain" (1054, line 100). Hamlet is stating his commitment to nothing short of revenge of his fathers ' death. There is little doubt about his state of mind at this point of the play. He can only talk about all of these plans to himself. He gets stuck in his head and therefore starts to argue these ideals with
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