Greco-Roman Culture

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In the early Middle Ages, Europe begins to make strides towards a new culture, one that was completely different from anything that had come before. By the beginning of the Middle Ages, the Western side of the Roman Empire was politically finished. Rome had previously been a largely influential political entity. Even though Rome no longer existed politically, its culture continued on, showing the culture of a society is more durable than the society itself. Prior to the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the early Middle Ages, Rome was identified as being the large icon of Europe. If someone was Roman, they took pride in this fact and identified themselves as such. However, this view began to change. The idea of a proper Roman citizen…show more content…
The new forming culture was heavily influenced by Roman culture, but many other cultures also contributed to the new hybrid culture that was present in Europe. The Greco-Roman civilization provided a large amount of classical influence on the new culture. Large portions of the population in Europe were not Roman, but they were influenced by the Romans. Roman law and language are kept and used, but they are each adapted in order to fit into this new culture. Because Rome was a largely successful empire, many elements of its culture were kept in the newly forming European culture. This new culture perpetuated many classical practices that were popular in the Greco-Roman civilization. The Greco-Roman civilization provided a large amount of classical influence on the newly evolving European…show more content…
It took parts of these cultures and adopted them, then adapted them so that they were beneficial to the new European culture. What made this possible is the fact that cultures are incredibly durable and capable of undergoing change. This new culture allowed Europe to grow and develop and eventually made a way for the modern world to emerge. The Renaissance was a major part of a transition into the modern world in Europe. As the Middle Ages progressed and Europe moved into the time of the Renaissance, Europeans began to have a great interest in returning to the classics. At this time, there is a resurgence of classical mentality, ideas, education, and many other cultural aspects. In the high Middle Ages, there is a shift in cultural focus from urban to agricultural. This focus on Agricultural production leads to a surplus in Europe, becoming the catalyst of change. Farmers develop a crop rotation system that leads to increased yield of crops. A surplus of crops allows for specialization of jobs, pushing the world towards the modern era. In cities, the conditions under which trade takes place are becoming more favorable. Trade allows for a flow of culture through many societies, allowing the cultures to influence each other, leading to further adapted cultures. The volume at which trade occurs in Europe increases, therefore, the European economy
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