Gilgamesh Weaknesses

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In The Epic of Gilgamesh we are lead to believe that the one way Enkidu and Gilgamesh, these great men who are only truly one third man, exhibit their weakness just through the finite supply of their existence. They are reduced to mere mortals in that they will inevitably succumb to death. In reality they are plagued by the most human of all mindsets. Gilgamesh possesses an insatiable lust for what he doesn 't have and an inability to recognize what is truly valuable until it is denied him. The mortal in him only values things in hindsight. In this essay I will argue that it is the true inescapable human weakness of Gilgamesh to not know what he has until it is gone or dwindling by way of demonstrating both the manner in which Gilgamesh values…show more content…
His limited time on earth is never something this story 's hero has ever had cause to consider at length. Although Gilgamesh himself states “Where is the man who can clamber to heaven? Only the gods live for ever with glorious Shamash, but as for us men, our days are numbered, our occupations are a breath of wind.” Thus proving that Gilgamesh recognizes his own mortality toward the beginning of the story and the temporary air held by actions of the individual. In a sense he rationalizes his recklessness with a Carpe Diem mentality but all the while never really coming to terms with what his mortality truly means (Epic 71). When he thought himself, at a distance. invincible his time meant little to him. Death was a vague figure in an aloof horizon and life was just…show more content…
Restless and bitter, Gilgamesh states, “How can I rest, how can I be at peace? Despair is in my heart. What my brother is now, that shall I be when I am dead” (Epic 97). Revealing the existential crisis Gilgamesh begins to experience once truly grappling with what dying means, as many do when so closely confronted with the death of a loved one. But it is not as if anyone who has had an existential crisis wasn 't previously aware that they would one day die. Gilgamesh describes himself as “... afraid of death” while his real vexation is that he now truly realizes he will be denied life one day, thus drastically increasing the value of his time to live (Epic 97). A man who is oppressed by mere boredom couldn 't possibly be asked to face the extreme, final and permanent burden of death. Gilgamesh cannot bear the thought of enduring an endless expanse of oblivion and or the obscurity that would one day consume his
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