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Gendercide: Elimination of One Sex

explanatory Essay
1707 words
1707 words
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Gendercide is a term referring to the elimination of one sex through selective abortion, infanticide, neglecting and abuse. Most of the time the preference is for male. The United Nation specialists estimate that as many as two hundred million girls are missing in the world today. To give a broad figure, they explain that people practicing gendercide in China and India eliminates more girls that than the number of girls born in America each year. All in all, they describe the phenomenon as the biggest single holocaust in human history.

We can see this phenomenon happening in different countries of Asia. As a matter of fact, China and India top the charts for skewed sex ratio at birth. They are also the most populated countries in the world. They are followed by Nepal and Vietnam for gender selection practice. Other examples are Pakistan and Bangladesh where they started using medical technology to determine the sex of the unborn child.

Around the world, the average birth ratio is around a hundred and five males for every one hundred females. The natural predominance in the number males is explained by the fact that they are more susceptible to disease early in life. Female babies are considered healthier and generally speaking, they attained puberty more easily. And by the time they all get to the reproductive age, the ratio is one to one. This ratio becomes a problem when it gets close to one hundred and eight boys to one hundred girls. Over that number, it is safe to assume that there are serious problems ahead. When we look at the figure in country that are suspected of practicing gendercide, we see rates going as high as one hundred twenty boys for a hundred girls. This number imbalance over several years repre...

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...ver the last decades, they managed to reverse the imbalance.

Men of the upper scale classes will find a partner easier than the one in the poor classes. Generally speaking, rich people across all societies do not have to struggle too much to get married. This is even a stronger reality in regions you have a shortage of women. Disadvantaged males in rural areas have less chances of finding a spouse.

If the first child is a boy and the gender preference is met, it seems less of a problem to have a baby girl as a second child. If the first children are girls, the pressure to have a boy is bigger; therefore you have more chances of practicing gender selection.

If you have money and security in your old age, you do not need a son to take care of you.

If you can save money, you are less pressured to have a boy because you are financially secured.

In this essay, the author

  • Describes gendercide as the elimination of one sex through selective abortion, infanticide, neglecting and abuse. the united nations estimates that as many as two hundred million girls are missing in the world today.
  • Explains that china and india are the most populated countries in the world, followed by nepal and vietnam for gender selection practice. pakistan and bangladesh use medical technology to determine the sex of the unborn child.
  • Explains that the natural predominance in the number of males is explained by the fact that they are more susceptible to disease early in life.
  • Explains that people practicing gendercide are using couple methods to ensure the success of their preference.
  • Explains that most women believe that boys and girls are equal. they blame external factors that are forcing them to abandon their baby girls.
  • Explains that gendercide is illegal in canada, but there are sex preferences in some ethnic communities.
  • Explains that in china and india peoples tend to prefer boys over girls. they can't afford to feed someone who's not fully contributing to the community.
  • Explains that in some countries, parents need to give a dowry when their daughter marries another man, which affects the preference of having.
  • Explains the one-child policy in china, which restricts couples from having more than one child. it is enforced by the family planning police, a military order.
  • Explains that in china, there are tens of millions more males than females living, which means that they will never find a wife inside the country.
  • Explains that women's bare branches are becoming a huge problem, as single men who are struggling to get married find undesirable ways of getting one. abduction, sexual assault, and human trafficking have also increased.
  • Explains that technology has contributed to sex ratio imbalance in the way that we can now predict the gender of the baby before he is even born.
  • Explains that economic development is not eliminating the problem completely, but it certainly helps to slow it down.
  • Argues that preventing gendercide has a lot to do with changing the way people think. the importance of women in these societies needs to be increased.
  • Explains that women could benefit from change in education, which plays a role in the gender preference. they can get respectable jobs and are less financially dependent.
  • Opines that a change in tradition does not happen overnight, but there are examples where values have been reversed overtime. south korea made efforts to change attitudes toward sex preference and over the last decades, they managed to reverse the imbalance
  • Explains that men of the upper scale classes will find a partner easier than the one in the poor classes. rich people across all societies do not have to struggle too much to get married.
  • Opines that if the first child is a boy and the gender preference is met, it seems less of an issue to have an infant girl. if first children are girls, the pressure is bigger; therefore you have more chances of practicing gender selection.
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