Gender Roles In The Renaissance Era

1103 Words5 Pages
The Renaissance era in my mind is the greatest era. The Renaissance era had a huge impact on our lifestyles today, from Culture, Society, and Religion. In order to fully understand the concept of the gender roles we must understand how the men and women at that time were viewed. Did the women have a Renaissance like the men? The way in which society valued men and women differed greatly. Men basically functioned as the ruling voice over all aspects of society. But the women had virtually no control over their role in society. The women of that time were excluded from any position of meaningful authority in any realm of society. Just like today’s society they established beauty as an important quality of life, and only men had the capacity to…show more content…
The duties of husband and wife were explicitly defined and expected to be followed by both men and women. The role of the husband is one of authority and dominance. Women were seen as inferior in their abilities to run a household and make moral decisions. A woman’s role as wife is also clearly defined. In the marriage contract, “. . . the wife must obey the husband. This obedience or submission extends not only to the performance of duties required by the husband, but also to the abstinence from those activities which are displeasing to him. Women who chose to become wives, which is the majority of the female population, agree to submit themselves to total control by their husbands. They move from living under the control of their fathers to living under the control of their…show more content…
“Intellectually, [women] were seen as limited; most Englishmen, including women themselves, thought that a woman was by nature incapable of higher learning, being framed by God only for domestic duties”. Women were not only excluded from the educational opportunities offered to men, they were thought of as physically unable to learn the same materials men studied. Furthermore, “many men seem to have regarded the capacity for rational thought as exclusively male; women, they assumed, were led only by their passions”. These women were unable to escape from their emotions long enough to learn something factual. This assumption is also related to Renaissance conceptions of biology. This rudimentary conception of heat as a biological difference led people to believe that women were inferior to men in almost every capacity except those dealing with domestic
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