preview

Gatsby and Daisy, Tom and Myrtle, and George and Gatsby’s Relationships in Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

Satisfactory Essays
Gatsby and Daisy, Tom and Myrtle, and George and Gatsby’s Relationships in Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby
In The Great Gatsby, Gatsby is a thirty-year-old young man that changed his lifestyle from having a poor childhood to becoming rich. In 1917, preparing to leave for World War 1, Gatsby, being presented as a military officer in Louisville, laid his eyes upon a charming, graceful young woman, Daisy Buchanan. Daisy was a beauty from Louisville. She then was not only Nick Carraway’s cousin but also suddenly the love of Gatsby’s life. In order to make him look like the perfect person for Daisy, Gatsby presented himself to have a clear background. In all reality, Gatsby participated in crimes, such as providing alcohol when it was illegal and selling stolen objects.
Daisy broke the promise she made to Gatsby when she told him she would wait for him. She ended up marrying Tom Buchanan, which also became the father of her child. She refers to her daughter as beautiful and gullible. She thinks women are just a pretty pawn in a man’s world (Fitzgerald). Gatsby set a goal that he would win Daisy back and would not give up on it until he achieved it. The attraction between Gatsby and Daisy is what causes her to be the one that allows him to fall into the love of his vision. There is not much detail that there is romance is this book but Fitzgerald allows us to see that she is not really what Gatsby sees her to be (Pidgeon).
He then bought a mansion on the East Egg and threw parties weekly to help him achieve this goal.
Gatsby convince Jordan to talk to Nick about setting up an arrangement where Daisy and he could meet up without Daisy’s knowledge of the meeting. In chapter 1, Gatsby was standing in his backyard on a warm night only to ...

... middle of paper ...

...shes. Curious, he asks Gatsby what happened and Gatsby’s response was that Daisy was driving and hit Myrtle with the car. Gatsby was there to make sure Tom does not hurt her in any way. Eventually, Daisy blamed Myrtle’s death on Gatsby after betraying him.

Works Cited

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scriber, 1925. Print.
Pidgeon, John A. "The Great Gatsby." Modern Age 49.2 (2007): 178+. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 13 Jan. 2014.
Sutton, Brian. "Fitzgerald's 'The Great Gatsby.' (Interpretation of F. Scott Fitzgerald's Novel)." The Explicator 55.2 (1997): 94+. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 13 Jan. 2014.
Sutton, Brian. "Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby." Explicator 59.1 (Fall 2000): 37-39. Rpt. in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. Ed. Linda Pavlovski. Vol. 157. Detroit: Gale, 2005. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 13 Jan. 2014.
Get Access