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Freedom Of Speech In Fahrenheit 451 By Ray Bradbury

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e a world where books were banned and all words were censored. Freedom of speech has always been considered to be the most fundamental of the human rights. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury emphasizes the importance of freedom of speech by giving readers a glimpse of how the world would be if written works were prohibited. The novel is considered to be a classic because it can usually be linked to society. The novel’s relevance is connected to its themes and its overall message. The themes of loneliness, alienation, conformity, and paranoia play a crucial role in the novel by showing how censorship can transform society negatively. Loneliness and alienation are recurring themes in this novel. Clarisse McClellan, a pivotal character in…show more content…
Guy Montag’s wife, Mildred, is the epitome of conformity. She almost killed herself but still claimed to be happy because that was how society had told her to act. Clarisse and Mildred are complete opposites. As written in Novels for Students Vol. 1, “Clarisse is shown in contrast to Montag’s wife, who totally accepts the values of the society, even when it is harmful to her health. Clarisse does not like the social activities that most people in the society like” (Novels for Students 142). Mildred acts represents most of the members of society by conforming and supporting society’s views. Clarisse, as well as Montag, was not pleased with the way society was. They both resisted conformity by asserting their views. Montag felt especially constrained by his society and the conformity it fostered. This motivated him to resist it and find others who shared his views, such as Faber and…show more content…
“Behind his mask of conformity, Montag gradually undergoes a change of values. Montag realized his life had been meaningless without books” (Liukkonen). In the beginning of the novel, Montag said, “It was a pleasure to burn. It was a special pleasure to see things eaten, to see things blackened and changed” (Bradbury 3). For most of his life, Montag conformed just like the other members of society. He set things on fire because it was his job and did not question whether or not it was the right thing to do. Throughout the story, however, he grew to find and voice his own opinions and resisted the conformity that his society stressed. When Montag had to decide whether or not to burn Beatty to death, he proved himself by not giving in to what was expected. He killed the captain of the police department, which was an entirely defiant act (Bradbury