Form Of Education In Melba Pattillo Beal's Little Rock Nine

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“Rewards and punishments are the lowest form of education.”- Chuang-Tzu Should the child be treated like a pet when it comes to education, rewarded when doing something right or punished when doing something wrong? Chuang-Tzu believed that individuals should transcend their desire for success and wealth, as well as their fear of failure and poverty. Therefore, education should not be enforced on a child- the desire for learning should come naturally to one. When a pupil is being forced into learning something because of the consequences it will bring if they dont, rather than learning something for the simplest pleasure of knowledge, it becomes impossible for the child to remember the information. A pupil will study to memorize the information…show more content…
Board of Education. Throughout her memoir she uses different rhetorical strategies and literary devices. When Melba began attending school at Central High, she had no idea of the hardships she would face. With Grandma India’s help, she learned how to become a warrior. Grandma India acts as Melba’s steely rock during her struggle to integrate Central High School. In terms of education, Grandma India symbolizes the teacher and Melba symbolizes the student. Every time Melba considers abandoning the struggle of integration, Grandma India encourages her to persist, reminding her of the purpose for which she was integrating at Central High, and how it 'll all be worth it at the end. She fortifies Melba with faith and stubbornness as she is able to provide Melba with a sense of purpose. In chapter 23 of “Warriors Don 't Cry” Grandma India suggests Melba to model her behavior in school after Mahatma Gandhi’s methods of passive resistance in India. “Change the rules of the game, girl, and they might not like it so much.” (Beals, 242). She is advising Melba to confront her attackers with kindness as a way of empowering herself. This helped Melba overcome her opposers and develop an emotional barrier so that the aggressive acts…show more content…
In her essay “School” she reflects the difference between the American and Japanese education systems. She claims that the education in Japan isn 't as effective for the pupil because of the harsh educational system they are submitted to. Rhetorical strategies and comparisons are techniques Mori uses to create a strong, convincing essay. Mori uses the rhetorical strategy of logos throughout her piece to appeal to the audience of her experiences in both the Japanese and American approaches to education. “On the timed tests we had every day, i could finish only half the problems before the teachers stopwatch beebed, telling us to put down our pencils. The results were put up on the wall, and my name was always near the bottom. i was told to “try harder,” but none of my teachers spent extra time with me to go over what i was doing wrong. Since i wasn 't given a real chance to improve, i decided after a while that i didn 't really care how i did.” (Mori, 133) Mori explains that her teachers method of teaching in Japan did not help her education. She was punished for “not trying hard enough” although she wasn 't told in what was it that she needed to work on. Mori uses the appeal to logos as she describes how the education system she was submitted to, affected her schooling. Most of her essay is based on logos as she describes the difference between American and Japanese school system. Mori bases her argument on the structural
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