Film Analysis Of 'The Age Of The Mass'

1156 Words5 Pages
2. This scene of the movie wants to show us the socioeconomic interpretation on American society in the 1930s as a consequence of increasing industrialization and the overwhelming effects of Great Depression or in other words “The Age of the Mass”. Mass production became routine and led to more affordable consumer goods so there was a rise in mass culture. It also wants to explain how such foolish, mechanic worker that requires no creativity or logic, reducing their importance to insufficient more than gears in a machine. Undoubtedly the film is filled by visual metaphors; like the scene Tramp disappears into the machine and is moved along by huge gears, to a scene in which he is fed by force because of a gadget which designed to decrease the…show more content…
Sports were quite popular in the early 20th century in the United States and Europe as a form of entertainment and a way for asserting national and racial worth. During the Progressive Era of the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, there was an outbreak of public interest in Native American culture and representation. Summer camps were established in the mountains which Native American students could live in tents and could do hunting, fruits picking and all kinds of sports. When white people came to visit the camping place and saw the Native American students’ strength and talents, enjoyed these sports very much and got entertained. During the early 20th century, one of Indian School was a national football powerhouse, and usually had competitions against other major sports all over the nation. Achievement like this confirmed that Native Americans could portray values that early 20th America held in the highest esteem, like athleticism and grand masculinity. High-profile sports also allowed Native Americans to beat white Americans at their own game and assert a modern Indian identity. Native American success in athletics fueled both acceptance and racism, often simultaneously, as fans cheered on Indian athletes with racial slurs and war-whoops. The white American public understood “Indianness” in hesitant and uncertain ways, both fascinated by it and morally opposed to…show more content…
As we talked in our class, this picture reminds me “The American Dream”. Part of that dream is the comforts of home ownership and the right to start a happy family. New Deal’s homeownership policy was the most transformative set of policies. New Deal housing policy changed the way mortgages worked and this allowed workers to buy and own homes, achieve wealth, and ultimately move into the middle-class. Up to the 1930s, it was extremely difficult to buy a home, largely because the credit market was much tighter. Mortgages typically required a huge amount of money for down-payment and were issued with high percentage of loan. New Dealers believed that making homeownership available to the working-class was central to fixing America’s economy and preventing future depressions. Homeownership is an essential part of the American dream. In the 1930s-40s, when the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) was formed, government played an important role to help the American people get this aspect of the dream. This aspect of the dream for African Americans differs from that gotten by other “White” Americans because they could not own a house in the white neighborhood and the conditions to buy a house were totally different and very difficult for them. In specific, the gap between homeownership rates between white households and African American households Housing was hugely
Open Document