Feminist Theory Of Poverty

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The Feminist Analyses Theory states because society tends to put women in more subordinate positions to men, they do not have access to the same jobs and opportunities (Macionis. 2015). Men are more commonly in positions and jobs of power than women, and make more money, therefore leading to the Feminization of Poverty. In 2014, the poverty rate for women was nearly 15 %, 5% more than men at the time (Anon. 2015). In addition, over half of the children living in poverty were headed by single mothers. The Feminist Theory argues that due to the high rates of Female poverty, and women raising children on their own, they are more likely to turn to less violent crimes for money (Macionis. 2015). For example, in 2013 women made up 41% of fraud arrests,…show more content…
The approach theorizes that society is constructed of all of the everyday interactions between individuals (Macionis. 2015). Therefore, what an individual constantly learns from others, how they communicate with people, and respond to everything around them, is what makes up society. When studying crime and why it occurs, Symbolic Interaction states that criminal or deviant behavior is typically learned from the people and events around them (Macionis. 2015). It is important to note that this theory is mostly applied to less severe and moderate crimes such as drug use, theft, burglary, etc. rather than extreme violent crimes, such as…show more content…
2015). From the way a person talks, to how they view the world around them, this is all individually constructed, and therefore so is crime. Research has proved a strong relationship between whether a child has been abused, and their likeliness for criminal behavior at some point in their life. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, 15% of all Male inmates in prison experienced some form of abuse as a child, the number grows to an astounding 37% for women in the system (Prather, Walter and Jeannie A. Golden. 2009). This forms a strong case for criminals who experienced this type of abuse and their reasoning for turning to crime (Prather, Walter and Jeannie A. Golden. 2009). Using the Interaction theory, for many of these individual’s extreme abuse was one of the first things experienced in life. They learned it from their parents or other family members, or maybe other children and teachers at school. From verbal to physical abuse, this type of interaction went on to form and become an essential part of their identity and reality. Abuse which was transformed to violence and deviancy whether to earn a living or let out rage upon another person resulting in a heinous
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