Feminism In The Great Gatsby

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Throughout Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby,” the role of women can be examined to demonstrate anti-feminism. Initially, Daisy is viewed as an innocent, loving character, but once her true motives are revealed, it is clear that she is very corrupt, desiring only money and power. This is used to show the stereotypical female who lives under the man for his possessions, and lacks the self-respect to stand against the opposite gender. She is not the only female to act like this, there are many, but her case is the most important because it directly influences all of the main characters. Gatsby is also portrayed as a stereotype: the boy who wants his true love and will do anything and everything to get her, even be accused of murder. Once each character…show more content…
In a lot of works, especially those of the early 20th century, women can be shown as mere stereotypes, and also lacking the values of a whole character, in other words, they are incomplete. In Gatsby, the reader is introduced to Daisy rather early in the novel. She is presented to Nick as a beautiful young woman, who has been chased after her entire life by an endless number of men. Daisy was viewed as very seductive and desirable, but the way it was written allowed her to have a sort of childlike innocence. “There was an excitement in her voice that men who had cared for her found it difficult to forget,” (14). Not only did she possess very beautiful physical qualities, but just the way she talked and cared for people gave the impression that she was far from the stereotypical female. Daisy seemed very independent; she would not settle for just anyone. Issues Daisy had with Tom are shown, but the reason she is staying with him first seems to be because of her child or simply because she cares too much; this still doesn’t create the anti-feminist environment seen as a whole. If feminism was examined after chapter one, the book would seem very pro feminism. Both Daisy and Jordan were very different from other ordinary females of this time era, but as the novel completed itself, the true twisted, and selfish intentions of Daisy are brought out through her interactions with…show more content…
Gatsby spent his entire life working up from poverty and finding ways to gain wealth. Through becoming an officer, he meets Daisy, but cannot have her until he can provide for her. This causes him to leave her in order to become wealthy, but as he does this, Daisy marries Tom, not for love, but for money. Even when Gatsby returns, Daisy still has trouble leaving Tom and telling him how she really feels. Perhaps this is because it is so sudden, which also shows how the male characters easily persuade female characters. Daisy had been with Tom for years and now Gatsby shows up, even eats lunch with Tom which is ironic, but expects Daisy to just walk away as if it’s not a big deal. “Tom was feeling the hot whips of panic. His wife and his mistress, until an hour ago secure and inviolate, were slipping precipitately from his control,” (131). This is when Tom begins to realize that he’s losing Daisy, but the important aspect of this situation is what Daisy is trying to get out of this and how the men can easily affect the women. After Daisy allows Jay to get blamed for the murder, and destroy his name for her, it shows how she had never cared about anyone but herself. She might have enjoyed spending time with Gatsby, but if he didn’t have the money that he did, she wouldn’t have even looked at him. Once Gatsby has this power, he is able to pressure Daisy into leaving her
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