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FORWARD ( 6th Jan – 8th Feb 2014)

Satisfactory Essays
Welcome back to the year 2014. We pray and hope that this year brings much happiness, peace, tranquilities and of course, some sweet smiles on your faces. After all, making you laugh despite the economic hardship and everyday adversaries and challenges is the aim of Kata Kata magazine. I hope we had achieved this noble vision last year.
Talking about smiles and challenges, the cankerworm in South Sudan and the Central African Republic comes into mind. Unfortunately, while we are praying and hoping that the 2014 ushers in peace and prosperity, our brothers and sisters in the Central African Republic and the newest independent country in the world, South Sudan, are tirelessly struggling to find food and shelter from destructive and mad conflicts engulfing their countries. It all started in South Sudan on December 15 after President Salva Kiir, from the country’s Dinka ethnic group, accused troops loyal to his dismissed vice president, Riek Machar from the Nuer community, of trying to stage a coup against him.
The accusations did not come as a surprise having in mind that the two men have never been known as political bed mates. Bed mates? I am not sure President Kirr likes Mr. Machar in bed! Nor does Mr Machar really want to share that bed with Mr. Kiir. Same with the Dinkas – at least going by the accusations and grudges of other ethnic groups against their Dinka brothers and sisters, who represent about 15% of the South Sudan population. Ironically, sharing the political bed with the Dinka tribe is exactly what the Nuer and other ethnic groups in South Sudan have been agitating for – at least openly. Wait a minute! The mother of confusion. The same Dinkas insist that other ethnic communities actually do not want any kind of po...

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... would say “political”) aggrandizement? The situation is not different in the Central African Republic where slaughtering of innocent citizens has been baptism political correctness?
Isn't high time we Africans focused on individual merits and achievements at the expense of tribal sentimentalism and fragmentation? Unless we systematically change our social cognition of individualism and tribalism and rather focus on qualifications and capabilities, we can hardly make it to the economic and political promised land, which our past strong breeds had fought gallantly for.
Encouragingly, some mediations, interventions and diplomatic chase games are going on behind the scene in the hope of finding a lasting solution to the problems in South Sudan and the Central African Republic. A good reason for some hopes and smiles. Kata Kata is here to make you smile - regardless.
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