F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Life, Narrator, and Criticism in The Great Gatsby

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This is a book called “The Great Gatsby.” A lot of affairs, sex, and violence happens in this book. We will meet traitors and best friends will even betray each other. Some girls in this book are also a deceiving. In The Great Gatsby, F Scott Fitzgerald has explored three separate themes: his own life, narrator Nick Carraway, and literary criticism. In The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald has explored three separate themes: his own life, narrator Nick Carraway, and literary criticism. Back then this good book called The Great Gatsby was released in 1925 (Shain). He could not think of anything else for the next novel (Shain). When it came to the twenties he was over his head (Shain). Fitzgerald was like a brother to Graham. She stopped all the rumors about him from his recent novels and stories (Doreski). Their social lives raised put more effort to make repeating small stories, for the “Saturday Evening Post”. Fitzgerald wrote a play that failed called the “The Vegetable”, they found durable frustration in getting to his other novel (Anderson). One of Fitzgerald’s most similar notices to homosexuality appears in a letter to Richard Knight of September 29, 1932. The letter rejoices with the book in its finishing state, for Fitzgerald had only just recently drew out his General Plan of the Dick Diver version of the book and his well known entry in his Ledger (Collins). I never saw my great uncle. But apparently me and his appearance is very close. A specific referral to the angry art sketch that was suspended in my Dad’s office (Fitzgerald). Fitzgerald has two different emotions to his characters as a ancient figure authorities program and inescapable human. At the level of sensible art conception, his mood is fully expected on th... ... middle of paper ... ...'s bias towards this novel's hero is central to the critique of belief in the 'American Dream'." The English Review 17.3 (2007): 9+. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 14 Jan. 2014. Tolmatchoff, V. M. "The Metaphor of History in the Work of F. Scott Fitzgerald." Russian Eyes on American Literature. Ed. Sergei Chakovsky and M. Thomas Inge. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1992. 126-141. Rpt. in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. Ed. Kathy D. Darrow. Vol. 280. Detroit: Gale, 2013. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 14 Jan. 2014. Tuttleton, James W. "Vitality and Vampirism in Tender Is the Night." Critical Essays on F. Scott Fitzgerald's Tender Is the Night. Ed. Milton R. Stern. Boston: Hall, 1986. 238-246. Rpt. in Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. Ed. Kathy D. Darrow. Vol. 280. Detroit: Gale, 2013. Literature Resources from Gale. Web. 14 Jan. 2014.
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