Expectations Of Women In The Great Gatsby

1123 Words5 Pages
A woman’s need to pursue society’s expectations of her can corrupt her entire view on relationships and human interactions. In the novel The Great Gatsby by Scott Fitzgerald, suggests that an individuals desire to achieve a standard of perfection in society can demoralize them into engrossing only what is best for themselves during conflict. Daisy is the epitome of a woman during the 1920’s, she wants nothing more than the appearance of a perfect family life, so when her future is indefinite she hides behind Tom’s wealth, and certainty to achieve her desires. Daisy’s persona is to conform to the expectations given to her to be a perfect housewife in society, and to fulfill her desire to achieve a standard of perfection within her family.…show more content…
Tom sees right through Jay’s little romance with Daisy as absurd, calling him out as, “crazy!”(125) Since his devotion for her boarders on obsession, creating a visionary life with Daisy, and unrealistic expectations she will never be able to fulfill. Tom sees the affair much differently as just a bump in the road, Gatsby’s expectations of Daisy will put her in unbelievable pressure and will overwhelm her. Overall Tom’s willing to forgive her, and let her continue living the life that she already has been, while Jay wants to change everything about her lifestyle. Daisy responds in between Jay, and Tom’s argument, saying “‘I did love him once − but I loved you too.’” (126) She is confronting her conflict, by trying to rationally infer what her decision should be to resolve this rivalry. By choosing Jay over Tom she would be essentially wrecking her marriage, and the future stability with Tom. She could never live up to Jay’s high expectations of her, and ruin the perfect illusion she has with Tom. Daisy could never give up what she is currently obtaining, and completely disregard the past to benefit Jay. Furthermore, Tom tries to take back Daisy by responding, “in my heart I love her all the time.’” (125) He uses his control…show more content…
After the altercation Daisy overlooks Jay, and his romanticism, because she cannot live up to his expectations. The last time they both catch sight of each other “she st[ays] there for a minute and then turn[s] out the light.’” (140) The absence of light metaphorically represents the end of their relationship, since their affair thrives in the light, when she turns off the light she is rejecting Gatsby for good. Daisy also makes the conscious decision to disconnect herself from Jay, because it would be irrational for her to ruin the illusion of a perfect family - with her husband, Tom - and run off with Jay to start a brand new life. The Buchanan’s feel that they need to escape the chaos, and “go away” (156) leaving everyone behind to gain a fresh start of achieving her desires. Ultimately, with Jay’s murder, and Daisy’s withhold from telling Jay the truth that their relationship is over, her decision is made for her. Daisy hates the idea of choosing, but Jay’s death eliminates the need to choose so she distances herself from him to move on with life. Nick is suddenly aware after Daisy leaves that Tom and her “retreat back into their money of their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together”. (170) This suggests that Tom and
Open Document