Existentialism In Humanism By Jean-Paul Sartre

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“Existentialism in Humanism” is a speech given by Jean-Paul Sartre given in 1946. Existentialism is a philosophy that states the existence of the individual person determines their own development through the acts of free will. Basically, this means that a person is free to decide and manipulate the course their life will take. They can control their reactions to situations, and cause other actions to occur. The argument made by Sartre is essentially nature vs nurture. The point Sartre argues is that existence precedes essence. Essence is defined as a person’s purpose in life while existence is something that is always changing. Existentialism is a philosophical theory that states the existence of the individual person determines their own development through the acts of free will, so a person is free to decide what they wish to do with their lives. This is classic nature vs nurture argument. Also, for this reason, I disagree with Sartre. It is not possible to state which came first, both play a massive role in shaping a person. Sartre…show more content…
One who believes in God can also believe in destiny and karma. Destiny and karma are generally associated with religion. It logically makes sense that someone is born for a reason. Certain situations occur, and certain people are born into certain lifestyles for a reason. Sartre thinks that essence can be defined as the purpose of someone’s life. If that is the case then wouldn’t it also make sense that humans as creatures evolved into being because they were supposed to. That doesn’t have to be because of God, but because of evolution and nature. Humans are made up of the smallest measuring unit and we have millions of them. Genetics, the genes that are found in me are also found in girls in Africa and the same building blocks are found in fruit, insects, etc. So I could have theoretically been coded to be a fruit fly instead of a human. That is not what nature

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