Examples Of Soft Power

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While the definition of power is a point of contention among scholars such as Morgenthau and Waltz, there is a general agreeance that power in an international sense is the ability to coerce a decision based on the political, military or economic clout a nation is able to exert onto another. By this definition the Cold War era of human history is one of the most prevalent examples of both economic and political power (referred too as “Hard” power) as well as cultural influence as a form of power (known instead as “soft” power). In the post-World War 2 era the balance of power theory played a major role in the international relations between the two superpowers, being the United States of America and The USSR through constant volleying of…show more content…
Instead the two nations used economic coercion (as mentioned before) as well as investing in science and technology fields to prove superiority. The classic United States example of soft power is the Marshall Plan. Not only did it provide economic recovery at little cost to European nations who accepted the help, but it also helped to diffuse American culture throughout Europe. Pop Culture, that was once limited to America was now desired worldwide. Elvis Priestley, Hollywood and Coca Cola all became global sensations due to the active intervention America provided in these countries. In Japan, America’s post World War Two influence was so powerful that the national “Christmas Meal” became Kentucky Fried Chicken (http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/why-japan-is-obsessed-with-kentucky-fried-chicken-on-christmas-1-161666960/?no-ist). America dominated what was interesting to the youth of these nations, and with this was able to exert influence through this. The Hollywood 10 blacklisting showed the dangers of being affiliated with communism, while popular magazines such as “Readers Digest” were actively anticommunist in their production. Films from Hollywood made their way to the Soviet Union and portrayed a life that the Soviets were unable to grasp, lives of luxury where you could own your own…show more content…
This term describes a security agreement based on a mutual defence principal, in which states create a sort of “all for one” mentality to dissuade attackers. (Waltz, 1979, pg. 167). The two most notable examples during this period were The Soviet Bloc and NATO, each providing a reason for the other not to declare war. However chain-ganging (also known on a more total level as “bandwagoning” where a smaller nation submits to a stronger nation so as to avoid direct pressure from said stronger nation (Wright, 1942)) lead to some engagement issues between the United States and USSR. In attempts to wrestle control of major powers away from each other, The United States and USSR would often back opposing entities such as the Nationalists and Communists in China, or Kim Ill Sung and the Southern Facists in Korea. These conflicts of interest would often lead to proxy conflict in the respective locations, however they were so perpetual that winning or losing an area wouldn’t make a dramatic shift in the power of either
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