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Euthanasia

opinionated Essay
1326 words
1326 words
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The issue that I chose to discuss in this paper is euthanasia. I am going to concentrate on the legal aspect of this issue in contemporary America as well as discuss two different types of the euthanasia. The word euthanasia is derived from the Greek words eu, meaning "good", and thanatos, meaning "death." In today's contexts, the word came to describe an intentional termination of patient's life to end his or her suffering. This topic has sparked a great controversy. The basic question posed by euthanasia is should a person who is terminally ill, who feels that his or her life is not worth living because of the unbearable pain, loss of dignity and capability to maintain his or her normal way of life, be given assistance in dying by his or her doctors. The issue today is should this "mercy killings" be legalized or should euthanasia be banned. There are two different types of euthanasia: active and passive. Passive euthanasia involves withholding medical treatment from a patient whose chances for surviving are nonexistent. This method mostly applies to a patient who is living of a machine. In order to stop the person's suffering the family decides to remove life support equipment. Another example that would be considered to be passive euthanasia is stopping medications. In other words passive euthanasia allows nature to take its course. This is the most popular form of euthanasia because it is legal. Active euthanasia involves a more direct and controversial actions by the doctors. It involves actions such as administering lethal injection, in response to a request from the patient to end his life. The most well known doctor who practiced active euthanasia was Dr. Kevorkian who assisted in about 130 euthanasia deaths.... ... middle of paper ... ...bortion, if it is illegal it can't be regulated and this actually leaves more room for abuse. If we legalize euthanasia, we can regulate the doctors, which in turn would benefit the patients. I predict that euthanasia will be legalized in the United States. I believe that the first step, which is usually the hardest one to make, already took place in the state of Oregon. I think it will serve as an example that euthanasia could be regulated and it will put many minds to rest. Bibliography 1) Keown, John. "Euthanasia Examined". 1995. Cambridge University Press. 2) Mchugh, James. "Death, Dying, and the Law". 1976. Huntington. 3) James, Rachel. "The End of Life: the Morality of Euthanasia". 1986. Oxford University Press. 4) http://www.ortl.org/pas_in_oregon/pas_experience_3.html

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that they will focus on the legal aspect of this issue in contemporary america and discuss two different types of euthanasia.
  • Explains that euthanasia refers to an intentional termination of a patient's life to end his or her suffering. the question is whether the "mercy killings" should be legalized or banned.
  • Explains that there are two different types of euthanasia: active and passive.
  • Explains that active euthanasia involves more direct and controversial actions by the doctors, such as administering lethal injection, in response to a request from the patient to end his life.
  • Explains that active euthanasia is still illegal in oregon, the only state that permits doctor assistant suicide for terminally ill patients.
  • Narrates how their grandfather was diagnosed with cancer less than a year ago. he was healthy and had never had any health problems before.
  • Opines that euthanasia should be legalized for terminally ill people who want to live a pain-filled life or have an easy death.
  • Opines that religious groups are the biggest opponents of euthanasia. they believe that nobody has a right to take away life from another human being.
  • Argues that the idea that doctors are going to abuse euthanasia is called slippery slope. hitler used "mercy killing" to get rid of the sick, disabled, and mentally retarded people in his society.
  • Explains that anti-euthanasia groups claim that the driving force behind the first 15 legalized assisted suicides wasn't uncontrollable pain, but rather a desire for personal control over life's end.
  • Explains that advocates of the anti-euthanasia movement claim that since oregon state health commission added assisted suicide to its list of services under oregon health plan, low-income families will now be paid by tax payers.
  • Opines that health care plans are willing to pay for active euthanasia because it is cheaper than prolonged care services. this crisis existed before the passage of the "death with dignity act."
  • Opines that euthanasia is incomplete without mentioning a parallel between it and abortion, since both revolve around personal choice.
  • Predicts that euthanasia will be legalized in the united states. the first step, which is usually the hardest one, already took place in oregon.
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