Essay On Physiological Psychology

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According to changing minds.org, Physiological psychology is the study of the physiological basis of how we think, connecting the physical operation of the brain with what we actually say and do. It is thus concerned with brain cells, brain structures and components, brain chemistry, and how all this leads to speech and action. It is also important to understand how we take in information from our five senses. Several persons contributed to the development of physiological psychology; such as Charles Darwin who were a biologist and whose theory of evolution revolutionized biology and strongly influenced early psychologists, René Descartes a philosopher and mathematician, Hermann von Helmholtz and Johannes Muller etc.Amongst them one of…show more content…
It is thus concerned with brain cells, brain structures and components, brain chemistry, and how all this leads to speech and action. It is also important to understand how we take in information from our five senses. Several persons contributed to the development of physiological psychology; such as Charles Darwin who were a biologist and whose theory of evolution revolutionized biology and strongly influenced early psychologists, René Descartes a philosopher and mathematician, Hermann von Helmholtz and Johannes Muller etc.Amongst them one of the most important figures in the development of experimental physiology was Johannes Muller. (Physiology Psychology, 2008) JOHANNES…show more content…
(Johannes Muller, 2014). The doctrine of specific nerve energies was his most important contribution to the study of physiology of behavior. He observed that all nerves carry the same basic message, but we discern the messaged of different nerves not the same. Because of his doctrine of specific nerve, experiments were performed directly on the brain of animals, which was done by Pierre Flourens a French physiologist. This was knows as experimental ablation. There after he claimed to have found the part of the brain which was responsible for breathing, controlling heart rate, purposeful movements and auditory reflexes. Soon after this experimental ablation was applied to a human brain. This observation led to show that a portion of the cerebral cortex on the front part of the left side of the brain performs the functions that are necessary for speech. This remains important to the understanding of the brain. (Physiology of Behavior,
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