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Essay On Mass Preventative Inoculations

explanatory Essay
871 words
871 words
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Mass preventative inoculations are vaccines administered en masse to a given population in order to reduce the likelihood of or prevent citizens from acquiring a certain illness. Oftentimes, mass preventative inoculations occur in early childhood, and many vaccinations are mandatory for children in various countries. Other times, mass preventative inoculations can occur later in life, serving as an option for those people who want to further protect themselves. Mass preventative inoculations should continue in the future to inhibit the spread of preventable diseases or to eliminate preventable diseases entirely. Mass preventative inoculations are a relatively new concept in the course of human history. Even though “the practice of variolation was used to prevent serious smallpox infection in China and India sometime about A.D. 1000,” mass preventative inoculations were extremely difficult, if not impossible, to accomplish (Plotkin 2). By 1796, this difficult began to diminish with the work of Edward Jenner. Edward Jenner is famous for his development of the smallpox vaccination, and after further advancements were made, “vaccination against smallpox soon became compulsory in Europe” by the early 1800s (Plotnik 2). Less than two centuries later, “an independent global commission certified that smallpox had been eradicated from the world” (Plotnik 4). Complete eradication of the illness is the ultimate goal of mass preventative inoculations, which explains why additional vaccinations were developed and used en masse, preventing illnesses that previously killed afflicted individuals upon contraction. Within the past several decades, several vaccinations have been developed and utilized to help reduce the likelihood of contracting... ... middle of paper ... ...n order to reduce the likelihood of contracting a given disease and work toward eliminating the disease entirely. Due to mandatory mass preventative inoculation in the early nineteenth century, smallpox was eventually eliminated. Since the early nineteenth century, a wide variety of other vaccinations have developed against countless diseases. Some vaccinations are compulsory in developed nations, while other vaccinations remain optional. Some of the most well known optional vaccinations include the vaccinations for influenza, tuberculosis, and hepatitis B. While some people challenge mass preventative inoculation, claiming that adverse effects may occur, the overall benefits of mass preventative inoculation outweigh the risks. Hopefully, other lethal illnesses, such as HIV, will eventually be prevented or altogether eradicated through mass preventative inoculation.

In this essay, the author

  • Explains that mass preventative inoculations are vaccines administered en masse to reduce the likelihood of or prevent citizens from acquiring a certain illness.
  • Explains that mass preventative inoculations are a relatively new concept in the course of human history. by 1796, this difficult began to diminish with the work of edward jenner.
  • Explains that vaccination against influenza is one of the most well-known optional vaccinations. while the flu shot is not compulsory for the population at large, some experts believe that it should be mandatory for citizens over 65.
  • Explains that the bcg vaccine helps prevent the likelihood of contracting tuberculosis, a bacterial illness that affects people's lungs.
  • Explains that vaccinations have been developed for hepatitis b, which is pervasive in developing countries across africa, asia, and south america. this vaccination prevents chronic hb infection and related cirrhosis and liver cancer.
  • Explains that despite the obvious benefits of mass preventative inoculation, some legitimate concerns do arise with regard to vaccinations.
  • Opines that mass preventative inoculation should continue to occur today to reduce the likelihood of contracting a given disease and work toward eliminating the disease entirely.
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