Essay On Color Blindness

1889 Words8 Pages
After many years of slavery and cruel Jim Crow laws, the United States has made unprecedented strides towards equality. Currently, the country holds itself to a notion of color blindness, to receive equal treatment across the board, no matter what their skin color happens to be. The history behind America as a color blind society does not stretch incredibly far back in time, in fact, it is a fairly modern concept. The belief in being color blind has permeated into almost every aspect of American society, from welfare programs to college acceptance goals. On the other hand, due to the pervasiveness of color blind policies, there are a variety of myths and misconceptions regarding programs that are in place to help underprivileged minorities.…show more content…
Although color blindness may appear to be noble at first glance, when looked at with scrutiny, color blindness is a camouflaged form of racism. Williams and Land write that, "As a result of what some scholars have defined White America 's race-related ideology as dysconscious, modern, symbolic, lassez-faire, or color blind--factors that contribute to racial inequality have taken on a more covert form.” By design, color blind legislation is in place to maintain the status quo of white dominance, even in the world of education. Many teachers claim to be color blind, stating that they treat all children as children, nothing more. What these teachers fail to recognize is that color blind racism affects many things including "high-stakes testing, student tracking and ability grouping, low teacher perceptions and expectations, lack of resources given to highly populated minority schools, blame placed on African American families for lack of involvement in education, racially disparate disciplinary reactions and consequences within schools, and poverty in African American communities.” (Williams and Land 579) Using tests to separate students by performance levels came about in the 1950’s, to help create a meritocracy in society. In modern times, testing gets employed in this way, with no regard to one’s background. In No Child Left Behind, testing is the number one factor in…show more content…
In a study conducted to better understand color blind racism, the researchers find that, “Racism springs not from the hearts of "racists" but from the fact that dominant actors in a racialized society receive benefits at all levels (political, economic, social, and even psychological), whereas subordinate actors do not." (Bonilla-Silva, Lewis, and Embrick 558) In the modern era, it is common to hear phrases such as, “Slavery ended long ago.” or, “I did not own any slaves.” or, “Jews have become successful, why haven’t blacks?” (Bonilla-Silva, Lewis, and Embrick 562) Many people believe that society should not treat any race differently because of what happened to that group in the past, no matter how horrible. This is wrong because not is the black community still recovering from past atrocities, all the while fighting modern racism and discrimination. In fact, some whites believe that programs designed to enfranchise African Americans can be considered “reverse discrimination.” When asked whether blacks should receive any reparations for past atrocities, a respondent had said, "It [slavery] doesn 't affect you. Me, as a white person, I had nothing to do with slavery. You, as a black person, you never experienced it. It was so long ago I just don 't see how that pertains to what 's happening to the race today, so...I 'm just like "God, shut up!""
Open Document