Equality Between Men And Women In A Doll's House By Henrik Ibsen

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In A Doll’s House, a play by Henrik Ibsen, he hints about the society and how the female gender was being treated during that time. Readers have observed from this play that Ibsen believed equality between men and women, and the idea of feminism. This play is where the readers can see and understand how things were like at the time, and what Ibsen believed about the issues. Norma Helmer, the main character from this play tries to strive towards the idea of perfection for society and her husband, Torvald. The title of this play is symbolic because Nora is being trapped within the “dollhouse” that is physically her home. Torvald has built a perfect life for his doll wife and his doll children. “The demands she embodies – to be regarded as an…show more content…
Anne Marie contains everything that Nora is not. She willingly gives up her child for adoption in order to survive in the society. When she’s made the decision to give away her daughter, she says that she has the right to. She accepts the role that society has placed on her. This is where Nora and Anne Marie both are similar because they both accept their positions they are in. Just like Anne Marie, Nora allows Torvald to choose where she stands in life. “The conceptions of Nora have also been colored by different ideological and feminist perspectives since in the first part of the drama emerges as highly articulate and moreover willing to leave her husband and three children” (Rekdal). However, when Nora makes the decision to leave Torvald and the children, the decision was not chosen because of what society attempts to force on her. Nora actually makes a real transformation and surprises everyone. When she shuts the door behind her at the end of the play, she is a woman seeking independence and freedom from the rules of society and the rules of men which has been placed upon her because of her…show more content…
In the beginning of the play, she shows her love toward her children, she plays with them and buys them toys, thus symbolizing Nora’s life, and that she is defined by her children. Majority of the women including Nora during her time period were defined by who their family was. Their lives were defined by children they raised and the husbands they married. At the beginning of act two when Anne Marie talks about how leaving her daughter, Nora cannot fathom how a mother could do something like that. Nora starts the conversation to Anne Marie asking if her children ask for her much. Anne Marie replies back saying that the children are so used to having their mother with them. She then says one line in the play that triggers Nora throughout the entire play when Nora says that she should not be around her children as often as before. Anne Marie mentions that children easily get accustomed to anything. It is that statement that Nora begins contemplating about her
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