Environmental Health Essay

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Environmental Health, as stated by Friis (2012), “comprises those aspects of human health, including quality of life, that are determined by physical, chemical, biological, social, and psychological factors in the environment”. Additionally he points out that “it also refers to the theory and practice of assessing, correcting, controlling, and preventing those factors in the environment that potentially can affect adversely the health of present and future generations” (Friis, 2012). Large proportions of current diseases are associated with environmental sources. It is estimated by the World Health Organization (WHO) in the report Preventing Disease Through Healthy Environments - towards an estimate of the environmental burden of disease that…show more content…
It is stated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that “asthma is a serious, sometimes life-threatening chronic respiratory disease that affects the quality of life for more than 23 million Americans, including an estimated 6 million children”. Mayo Clinic defines asthma as “a condition in which airways narrow and swell and produce extra mucus” that “makes breathing difficult and triggers coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath”. Irena Buka (2006) reports that “the Committee on Environmental Health of the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a policy statement in 2004 emphasizing the link between ambient air pollution” (defined by WHO as pollution emitted from industries, households, cars, and trucks) “and children’s health”. “Children are known to be more vulnerable to the adverse health effects of air pollution due to their higher minute ventilation, immature immune system, involvement in vigorous activities, the longer periods of time they spend outdoors and the continuing development of their lungs during the early postneonatal period” (Buka, 2006). According to Coordinated Federal Action Plan to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Asthma Disparities announced by EPA, “approximately 7 million children age 0 to 17 in the U. S. have asthma, with poor and minority children suffering a…show more content…
The children were followed for up to 8 years and the results of the study provided robust evidence that “lung development… from the ages of 10 to 18 years, is reduced in children exposed to higher levels of ambient air pollution” (Gaudermna, 2004). The GALA II and SAGE II studies of early-life air pollution and asthma risks in minority children led by UCSF (University of California, San Francisco) observed of 5,000 participant from Chicago, Bronx, Houston, San Francisco and Puerto Rico from 2006 to 2011. The results of these studies showed that African American and Latino infants living in communities with poor air quality due to traffic-related pollutant are more likely to develop childhood asthma (Thakur,
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