Emotional Intelligence Case Study

1338 Words6 Pages
immediately on how to manage this incident. Seo and Barrett (2007) found that contrary to the popular belief that feelings are generally bad for decision making, individuals who experienced more intense feelings achieved higher decision-making performance; they argue that feelings whether positive or negative generate a sense of energy that leads people to devote a greater amount of effort to a task. Furthermore research by Sosik and Megerian (1999) found that leaders with high levels of emotional intelligence were self-aware and confident and therefore more able to guide teams. The way I managed my feelings could facilitate or hinder the decision making process, I had to ensure that my anxiety did not result in “toxic decision processes”,…show more content…
The second social component demonstrates an understanding that staff were feeling stressed and anxious themselves. If I were to use my negative emotions to challenge staff for not knowing what to do I would be implementing a toxic management style (Lubit, 2004) that destroys staff moral and diverts their energy from working together to resolve the task at hand. By negatively saying “You should have done this” and “Why didn’t you do that”, I would be applying a commanding style of leadership (Goleman, Boyatzio and McKee, No date) that Hughes (2013) identifies as being a high risk method of management. Commanding and controlling management styles create a dependency on the manager to make decisions rather than promoting a collaborative team approach. Implementing a combination of Visionary, Coaching and Affiliative style of leadership (Goleman, Boyatzio and McKee, No date) uses positive techniques that promote harmony and team…show more content…
Burton (2009) found that studies of serious case reviews indicated that bias can cloud people’s judgements and lead to missed opportunities to protect a child. Hart and Powell (2006) suggest basing your judgements on evidence not opinions. In addition, they urge practitioners to speak to the child. Subsequently, I chose to speak to the child whom disclosed further information about occurrences at home. Munro (2011) stresses the importance of the voice of the child being heard in child protection cases and this disclosure highlighted its significance because in this incident the child provided further information to indicate a need to inform social services to protect the child. After approaching the safeguarding officer with new information she suggested we monitor the situation to gather further evidence as she did not want to unnecessarily upset the
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