Dysfunctional Therapy: Cognitive-Behavior Therapy

1651 Words7 Pages
Cognitive – Behavior Therapy Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is part of a psychotherapy treatment that can solve mental problems and boost happiness by modifying dysfunctional emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. CBT focuses on encouraging, and challenging patient’s cognitions and change the dysfunctional behavior patterns by effective solutions. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is used to treat the mental and emotional part of behavior such as an eating disorder. This type of therapy is done to change how you think and feel about food, eating, and body image. It can also poor eating habits and prevent relapse. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is considered effective for the treatment of eating disorders. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is type of counseling…show more content…
The therapist acts as a compassionate facilitator, listening without judgment and acknowledging the client’s experience without moving the conversation in another direction. The therapist is there to encourage and support the client and to guide the therapeutic process without interrupting or interfering with the client’s process of self-discovery. A person centered approach is about ensuring someone with a disability is at the center of decisions which relate to their life. A person centered process involves listening, thinking together, coaching, sharing ideas, and seeking feedback. The goal is for the client to achieve greater independence. This will allow the client to better cope with any current and future problems they may…show more content…
Your therapist will not judge or try to interpret what you say, but may restate your words in an attempt to fully understand your thoughts and feelings. When you hear your own words repeated back to you, you may then wish to self-edit and clarify your meaning. This may happen several times until you decide that you have expressed exactly what you are thinking and how you feel. There may be moments of silence to allow your thoughts to sink in. This client-focused process facilitates your self-discovery, self-acceptance, and a provides a means toward healing and positive growth. Person-centered therapy was a movement away from the therapist’s traditional role—as an expert and leader—toward a process that allows clients to use their own understanding of their experiences as a platform for
Open Document