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Dubois Theory Of Double Consciousness

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During the course of my studies, I’ve learned so many things about our people. I’ve learned about some of our greatest scholars, such as W.E.B. Dubois. I’ve learned how African-Americans such as Fannie Lou Hamer fought for voting rights through Freedom Summer. I’ve learned about powerful ancient African civilizations, such as the Axum Empire. I’ve also learned how hard our ancestors fought so that I could be educated about our history in school. Being educated about our history has given me a stronger sense of pride in being African-American. I want to share some of what I’ve learned with you, so that you will know the incredible things we have achieved as a people. One of the most important black figures…show more content…
He claimed that although slavery was over, African-Americans were not treated as full and equal citizens. Dubois developed the theory of double consciousness to explain the social divisions that exist in America. Double consciousness describes the feeling that your identity is divided into several parts, making it difficult to develop a coherent identity. Dubois discussed this within the context of being black in America. He asserted that because of the exploitive relationship that black people have had with America, African-Americans struggle to reconcile these two cultures that compose their identity. He describes the “veil” that has been put over African-Americans, so that others do not see them as they are, but only through the lens of racial prejudice. The pervasive racism in American culture can cause African-Americans to internalize their own oppression. This leads to the sensation of double consciousness, which Dubois describes as “the sense of always looking at one’s self through the eyes of others, of measuring one’s soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity“ (DuBois). This experience is demoralizing to African-Americans, causing their self-image to be distorted by the racist perceptions of whites. This issue is ever-present in American…show more content…
Like everything we’ve gotten in this country, it was not without a fight. Many young people organized, campaigned, and protested to establish the institutions we have today. The establishment of African-American studies programs was born out of the Black Studies movement. During the 1960s, black students at predominantly white institutions began to organize and demand that black studies curricula be instituted and that black faculty be hired. This movement led to the formation of programs, departments, and institutes, and centers at American colleges that we benefit from