Dishonesty Of Women In F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby

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however she is aimlessly flirtatious. Fitzgerald presents all three women in a criticizing manner; Daisy is weak and careless, Jordan is dishonest and haughty, and Myrtle is unfaithful. Nick describes Jordan as “incurably dishonest”. This introduces the ideology of distrust of women in the novel. In 1922, American women did not have the same rights as men and were often trapped in oppressive marriages and seen as the inferior sex. This inferiority is reflected through the way in which women have a secondary role in this novel. Nick’s citation concerning the dishonesty in a woman depicts the way in which throughout the novel, women’s flaws are almost exonerated. This citation of Fitzgerald also advocates that, because women do not have the same moral…show more content…
This possible proposition provides an explanation for Jay Gatsby’s ignorance towards Daisy’s vindictive nature, and Nick’s swift forgiveness of Jordan’s fraudulence. In” The Great Gatsby” the social, cultural, and emotional expectation of women seems to be in contradiction to women who are meant to empower others. The three main women within the story are not given substance; instead they are more defined by their relationships. Women are dependent upon their partners because marriage defined ones social status or success. This dependency stemmed from the idea of success. Unfortunately Daisy, Myrtle, and Jordan’s lives are defined by their partners, and are left up to the status of whom they marry. For instance Daisy, despite her love for Gatsby, it is apparent wealth and status overruled her love for him. She
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