Development Of Oral Language

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Developing Children’s Oral Language Oral Language: The ability to communicate in spoken form. The more fluent and automatic language is for a young person the more likely they are to advance in reading skills. It refers to hearing, understanding and the ability to use language both expressively and receptively. Expressive Language: The ability of a person to communicate, orally, in writing, gestures, art, through pictures or video. The person speaking must “encode” their thoughts into a symbolic form so as to be received and understood by a listener. Receptive Language: Receiving language from another person and (s)he must “decode” the speaker’s communication. Receptive language will include language, gestures along with pictures and videos.…show more content…
A low mean is a predictor of delayed language development. It is calculated by counting the number of morphemes in an utterance divided by the total number of utterances. Language Functions: real world and classroom-based language practice. The study of pragmatics forms the basis for oral language. Understanding how language is used (instrumental, regulatory, interactional, personal, heuristic, imaginative, representational, divertive, authoritative and perpetuating. Forms of Language: Forms of language refers to the vocabulary, verb tense, parts of speech and the sentence structure of language. Research reports that teachers must understand and use these tools with the students because they influence the development of the student’s language. Language Fluency: Language fluency refers to the fluency in wide variety of ways that language can be used. Young learners or older students with language deficits need direct instruction in the differences between conversational and academic language and the differences in telling a story to explaining the steps to a…show more content…
An interactive method of instruction, by which teachers and students work together, to solve a problem. Joint productive activity promotes learning, improves language and helps connect core subjects to daily activities. Electronic Talking Books: Electronic devices that are capable of reading a passage or story out loud while showing text on a screen. Devices such a Kindles or Ipads have this capability. Research has shown the benefit to improve listening comprehension and language. Readers can build background knowledge and language. Students with reading struggles can enjoy a story they may otherwise not be able to read. Dialogic Reading: A process by which a teacher interactively reads a book with a child with the goal to improve language. The teacher uses the pictures, and some text, incorporates ‘wh’ questions and requires specific actions to improve language. Such actions may include repetition of specific sentences to restructure language and increasing sentence length. The goal is to expose a young or language impaired learner to improved sentence length and
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