Describe Depression

1160 Words5 Pages
For this document I will be describing depression. I will be referring to a person I know, and will refer to her as Jane. Jane is 18 years old, and has been formally diagnosed with depression. Depression can be debilitating. It can keep you from going out with friends, from going to work, and from going to school. It can make you feel empty, alone, and sometimes worthless. It is believed that nearly 15 million Americans deal with a form of depression each year. They type that Jane struggles with is dysthymia, which is less severe, but is a more chronic. Dysthymia is a depressed mood that lasts for at least two years, and comes with insomnia, low energy or fatigue, and poor concentration, among other symptoms. It is two times more likely to…show more content…
Freud saw depression as a form of grief and as a reaction to a loss of an important relationship. When depressed people think of themselves as worthless, they are relating themselves to the person they lost, and project the anger they are feeling on themselves (http://www.simplypsychology.org/depression.html). This fits Jane, because she frequently sees her self as worthless, and regularly makes posts about it on social media. The cognitive approach to depression says that depression is the result of systematic negative thinking. Psychologists that follow the cognitive theory think people with depression frequently see the world in a negative light, which causes their depression (Comer, 2014, p. 186). Cognitive research has shown that people with depression think differently than people who are considered clinically normal. The changes in thinking start before the depressive mood does. Jane said she is usually very pessimistic and has trouble seeing anything in her life as…show more content…
However, some psychologists believe in the artifact theory, which says men and women have equal chances in developing depression, it’s just easier to find in women, because they show their emotions more (Comer, 2014, p. 192). Another part of the sociocultural approach is based off of people’s cultural backgrounds. Depression can be found around the world, however people in the non-western countries are more likely to deal with the physical symptoms that depression can bring, but usually have fewer of the cognitive symptoms. Additionally, Hispanic and African Americans are 50 percent more likely to have reoccurring depression during their lifetime (Comer, 2014, p. 196). The biological approach says that some people inherit a tendency to develop depression. According to family pedigree studies, as many as 20% of relatives of the people involved in the study have depression (Comer, 2014, p. 176). In a study reported by the Mayo Clinic, people who have depression have physical changes in their brains, however the importance of the changes that take place is still unknown (http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/basics/causes/con-20032977). Jane inherited depression and other mental health issues from her father, and his side of the family. At least one person in every generation of her father’s family has struggled with a form of
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