Declaration Of Independence Summary

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The Declaration of Independence stands as a representation of justice, equality, and natural human rights. With it being written to liberate the American citizens from British control; allowing the citizens to live freely as they wish - as equal humans. However, there are numerous discrepancies and controversies to this document. Especially in the field of gender-equality and women 's rights. Mary Wollstonecraft, writer of A Vindication of the Rights of Women, is a forerunner of this movement. Comparing her work to the Declaration of Independence, it can be seen that Wollstonecraft 's work can be served as a critique against the masculinity put forth in the Declaration of Independence. With the declaration making numerous remarks with recognition…show more content…
Both are pushing for equality, and for citizens to embrace their natural human rights. For the declaration, its equality of the American citizens against the British; and for Americans to have their natural rights of free speech, freedom of religion, etc. Throughout the declaration, there is much polarization against the British Empire based on how the British were oppressing the American Citizens. "In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury" (America In Class, 5), a closing line in the Declaration of Independence, dictates how with every act of Oppression the British has put forth onto the American Citizens (For example, with the unreasonable search and seizures, " He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our people, and eat out their substance" (America In class 3), showing how the Americans lost their right of privacy to the British), and how when the Americans try to exercise their right to speech; they are harassed and punished even more. The Declaration sets forth for the Americas to become equal to that of Britain, where its citizens can retain and exercise their rights - as well as stand equal as a country to their former…show more content…
"This is the very point I aim at. I do not wish [women] to have power over men; but over themselves" (Wollstonecraft 63). Wollstonecraft made this statement in response to Roseau dictating that if society "[Educated] women like men..." (Wollstonecraft 63), and women would resemble the male sex, and then carry less power over men. Instead of succumbing to men, Wollstonecraft stressed how education could elevate a women to reach equal statue in society. Following similar ideas to the Tao Te Ching and the Art of War, Wollstonecraft serves education as a tool of discipline to women who can use it to help elevate them in society. Wollstonecraft points out in her introduction that, "One cause to [the problem of women sacrificing their usefulness and strength to beauty attributes] to a false system of education..." (Wollstonecraft 6), and how a reformation and push for women to better educate themselves and look past what is currently there will help them reach higher status in society; therefore giving them their own independence. As Wollstonecraft dictates, "It follows then, I think, that from their infancy women should either be shut up like eastern princes, or educated in such a manner as to be able to think and act for themselves (Wollstonecraft
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