Death on the Cross

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INTRODUCTION
For centuries, the canon narratives of the crucifixion and resurrection have been told through various Medias. The interpretations of these essential scriptures were influenced and shaped by the theological perspectives of the era they were formulated. The rendered expressions functioned as confessions of faith, teaching instruments, sources of devotion, expressions of individual piety and hermeneutical reflections.1
The passion and resurrection narratives are fundamental to Christian faith. The synoptic accounts have often been woven together and communicated through the worship arts, including devotional books, musical compositions, plays, visual arts, poetry, pilgrimages, interpretive dance, and so forth. The history of interpretation often incorporates all of the gospel accounts even when interpreting one gospel in particular. We will not endeavor here to reflect on the full scope of the related scriptural material or multimedia forms of communication; however, it is important to note, that the passion narrative is often interpreted intertextually through non-textual media, and this process has both reflected and influenced the faith, concerns, and criticisms of Christianity.2
It is acceptable and valuable to view the narrative through its combined story. The witness of an individual biblical narrator can be read in the perspective of the entire Bible because the church was given the entire Bible.3 However, It is also valuable to view the narrative through the eyes of the individual authors whose inspired works, each reflect specific theological purposes and are set within a specific cultural context. This paper will examine how the crucifixion is depicted in the Gospel of Matthew paying ‘spec...

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...cles, Matthew, Mark. editor, Leander E. Keck et al. (Abingdon Press: Nashville, 1995), 97.15 Donald Senior. 1016 M. Eugene Boring. The New Interpreter’s Bible: A Commentary in Twelve Volumes: Volume VIII, New Testament Articles, Matthew, Mark. editor, Leander E. Keck et al. (Abingdon Press: Nashville, 1995), 99-100.17 Andrew Overman. Matthews Gospel and Formative Judaism: The Social World of the Matthean Community. (Fortress Press. Minneapolis, 1990), 23.18 Donald Senior, C.P. Between Two Worlds: Gentiles and Jewish Christians in Matthew’s Gospel. 1999, 18.19 Donald Senior, C.P. Between Two Worlds: Gentiles and Jewish Christians in Matthew’s Gospel. 1999, 5.20 M. Eugene Boring. The New Interpreter’s Bible: A Commentary in Twelve Volumes: Volume VIII, New Testament Articles, Matthew, Mark. editor, Leander E. Keck et al. (Abingdon Press: Nashville, 1995), 99-100.
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