Death of a Bird: Trifles by Susan Glaspell

945 Words4 Pages
Death of a Bird Critical Perspective Analysis In the play “Trifles” by Susan Glaspell, the play approaches the psychoanalytic perspective. As the play approaches many different angles from many characters, it is discussed from two women the behavior she accumulated. The inner mind of an individual develops unconscious thoughts which in result proceeds to the psychoanalytic perspective. The woman in this story is affected by it because of the environment that cages her in turmoil. The psychoanalytic perspective was first discovered by Sigmund Freud which uncovers the nature of the mind and leads to the discovery of the unconscious. The unconscious is layered underneath as the proprietary element of the individuals mind, it is built over time and is only revealed through dreams, and slips. The development of the unconscious can be built at an early stage, as it shapes our personality. The individual does not have access to the unconscious as it’s deep in the mind and we find these events and feelings unacceptable for our conscious. As the play trifles proceeds the psychoanalytic perspective is seen in one of the earliest scenes towards letting the unconscious slip. For example in this short conversation, “County Attorney: And how did she ­look? Hale: Well, she looked queer. County Attorney: How do you mean queer? Hale: Well, as if she didn’t know what she was going to do next. And kind of done up.” After the initial conversation the suspect displays a confirmation of abnormal behavior which displays a reflection of something done. This psychoanalytic perspective discussed in the first scene creates a point of view of someone holding something deep in the mind as they finally let it loose, as they ponder wondering over what just occ... ... middle of paper ... ...rying it later on, the only thing she really loved at that moment, which is buried in the unconscious. Works Cited Glaspell, Susan. "Trifles." Making Literature Matter. 5th ed. Boston: Bedford St.Martins, 2012. 941­52. Print. Wolff, Tobias. "The Rich Brother." Making Literature Matter. 5th ed. Boston: Bedford/St.Martins, 2012. 323­36. Print. Boyle, Coraghessan. "The Love of My Life." Making Literature Matter. 5th ed. Boston: Bedford/St.Martins, 2012. 556­69. Print. Hurston, Zora. "Sweat." Making Literature Matter. 5th ed. Boston: Bedford/St.Martins, 2012. 731­40. Print. Carter, Angela. "The Company of Wolves." Making Literature Matter. 5th ed. Boston: Bedford/St.Martins, 2012. 1085­092. Print. Harris, Scott Duke. "Online Memorials: Internet Adds New Dimension to Grieving Process." Making Literature Matter. 5th ed. Boston: Bedford/St.Martins, 2012. 671­73. Print.
Open Document