Critical Analysis Of Magazines In Jennifer Nelson's Airbrushed Nation

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Since the mid-1700s, magazines have been a great source for a variety of different tips, stories, recipes, inspirations, and entertainment; even now in a society that is widely dominated by all sorts of technology. However, Jennifer Nelson’s Airbrushed Nation (2012) takes readers into the real world of women’s magazines, revealing their darkest secrets and the truth behind their content which continues to create controversy among critics against magazines, while keeping the content within her own novel pleasing for her readers. Generally speaking, Nelson (2012) centers her analysis of women’s magazines on three primary sociological concepts: gender roles, the mass media’s influence on its readers, and the thriving economy and the lengths industries…show more content…
In Airbrushed Nation, Nelson (2012) shines a light on the differences between how men and women are viewed by the majority of the magazine industries. With regards to the media’s influence on its readers, although magazines have their quirks in modern society, critics say that the media, including magazines been negatively influencing many individuals, majority being females, with their excessively photoshopped models, false advertising and articles, and controversial ideals for years on end. Furthermore, the sole purpose of providing false standards and content with magazines is to ultimately bring sales up in order to keep the magazine industries…show more content…
Nelson (2012) states “even if the danger is slight, trumped up, or practically nonexistent, fear sells women’s magazines” (pg. 155). In other words, magazines choose headlines that will ultimately lead possible customers to automatically turn their heads to the cover, using exaggerations such as the potential deadly risks of overusing cellphones or the shocking consequences of not washing off makeup every day. In the magazine industry, there is no fine line between reality and what the editors made up on the
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