Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky

898 Words4 Pages
In Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, the theme of duality and the conflict between personal desires and morals is present throughout much of the novel. There are dual conflicts: one external between a disillusioned individual and his world, and the other internal between an isolated soul and his inner thoughts. It is the internal conflict in the main character, Raskolnikov, that is the focused on for much of the novel. The first of Rodya’s two sides is his intellectual side. This side of rodya is inhumane, and exhibiting extreme self-will and power. This is the side of him that comes up with his theory. The crime was a result of his theory that some people possess extraordinary abilities while others have no ability. It's this intellectual side of him that caused him to conceive and execute his murder. Through the authors use of setting tone, diction, and allusion, the readers get a better understand if what type of character, rodya is. The actions in the novel that seem to be strange and ironic they are rather the result of the two aspects of Rodya's personality. When he refuses to let Dunya marry Luzhin and then a few moments later he tells her to marry whomever she pleases, this change in opinion is an example of rodya’s human side not wanting his sister to sacrifice herself to help him, and then the intellectual side contending that he must not concern himself with insignificant problems of others when he is going through his own problem. Throughout the book, he constantly desires to confess, even when visiting the police station. "I'll go in, fall on my knees, and confess everything" (97), he thought; later, he considered if it was "better to cast off the burden without thinking" (107). When he confessed to... ... middle of paper ... ... the psychology of a criminal before and after the crime. Raskolnikov appears resentful, but never argues about what Porfiry tells him,.In the last meeting of the two men, Porfiry admits that he liked the article very much, and actually felt a connection with it. The one part of the main body of the article that is mentioned is "that the perpetration of a crime is always accompanied by illness" (259) Throughout the book, he constantly desires to confess, even when visiting the police station. "I'll go in, fall on my knees, and confess everything" (97), he thought; later, he considered if it was "better to cast off the burden without thinking" (107). When he confessed to Sonia, he felt as if "he must not lose another minute" (404). After he asks Sonia to forgive him, she tells him to ask God for forgiveness. Works Cited www.shmoop.com www.123helpme.com
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