Court Systems and Criminal Justice

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The two types branches of our court systems is the duel court system (Bohm & Haley, 2010, p 288). Each system in the Federal or State side contains numerous possibilities in their jurisdiction with their authority to of the court to hear and decide cases (Bohm & Haley, 2010, p 288). However, the two courts described are: Trial Courts of Limited Jurisdiction and Trial courts of General Jurisdiction. Trial Courts of Limited Jurisdiction is a state court that is referred to as the “lower court”; interestingly some states have no formal legal training requirements to serve as a judge in this type of court. Typically this lower court deals with minor cases of ordinances, misdemeanors, traffic violations, and some civil cases involving less than $1000.00 (Bohm & Haley, 2010, p 295). Trial courts of General Jurisdiction involve the next higher court at the state level called “district court”; this court has the authority to hear and try all civil and criminal cases and to hear appeals from lower courts. These district courts can have several specialty courts that augment the system to identify or deal with social issues that arise, an example is drugs (Bohm & Haley, 2010, p 296).

Many of the cases where citizens have violated the law and could have been arrested by a certain law enforcement agency (or agencies) will have jurisdiction based on the location and/or subject matter of the crime. Jurisdiction is defined as “the authority given to a legal body, such as a law enforcement agency or court, to adjudicate and enforce legal matters.” Jurisdiction is not always clear and can overlap, just like with civil and criminal law. Therefore the responsibility from the local agency at the time of arrest has to determine the jurisdic...

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..., 2010, p 235).

Source:

Bohm, R. & Haley, K. (2010) Introduction to Criminal Justice, (6th Ed) published by

Glencoe/McGraw-Hill New York, NY.

Davila, N. (2011) Factsheet, A series of guides for neighborhood leaders working to

improve the quality of life. Vol No 3. Retrieved from

http://www.cj.msu.edu/~outreach/rcpi/index.html

References

Atlas, R (1991) Changes In Prison Facilities As A Function Of Correctional Philosophy.

History of Prisons, Chapter 3, Atlas Safety & Security Design, Inc. Miami, Florida.

Bohm, R. & Haley, K. (2010) Introduction to Criminal Justice, (6th Ed) published by

Glencoe/McGraw-Hill New York, NY.

Davila, N. (2011) Factsheet, A series of guides for neighborhood leaders working to

improve the quality of life. Vol No 3. Retrieved from

http://www.cj.msu.edu/~outreach/rcpi/index.html
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