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Congress And Bureaucracy

Congress and the Bureaucracy has a special relationship of checks and balances. There are methods set up by the constitution that allow Congress to influence the bureaucracy. In doing so, Congress is often able to hold a considerable amount of control over the bureaucracy. The bureaucracy consists primarily of the executive branch of government, and its components. These include cabinet departments, independent agencies, regulatory commissions, and government corporations. Through the constitution, Congress is tasked with the responsibility of organizing and funding the bureaucracy. This gives Congress the inherent rights, among others, to enact statutes to establish or abolish executive agencies or departments, call for reorganization of…show more content…
Instead, Congress often delegates to federal entities authority to craft rules and regulations needed to carry out the mandates of laws. In order to maintain oversight over the entities that Congress grants authority to, Congress has established a requirement to publish a notice in the Federal Register detailing their proposed rules. Interested parties are then allowed a time period to express their concerns over said methods. Although it is not specifically mentioned in the constitution, through all of these rights, Congress holds an inherent oversight role over the bureaucracy. The role flows from Congress’ power to make laws, raise and appropriate funds, give advice and consent to executive nominations, and impeach federal officials. This gives Congress a means of checking the power of the executive branch, as well as a method of determining if laws are being enacting…show more content…
The 109th Congress questioned the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) after Hurricane Katrina. Congress called for mandatory reports from the white house, Inspectors Generals, the Government Accountability Office, and others. A common denominator in all of these findings were that some of the losses brought by Katrina were caused, at least in part, by deficiencies within FEMA; such as: questionable leadership decisions, organizational failures, and inadequate legal authorities. As a result of these findings, Congress further utilized their control strategies to reorganize FEMA, and restructure the way responsibilities were handled following emergencies. Congress passed the “Post-Katrina Emergency Reform Act of 2006” in order to accomplish these revisions. This newly enacted bill reorganized FEMA, expanded its authority, established new leadership positions and position requirements within FEMA, and imposed new conditions and requirements on the operations of the agency. Congress also utilized the appropriations process to influence this portion of bureaucracy by enacting supplemental appropriations, one-time waivers of requirements and temporary
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