Comparison Of The Babylonian Flood Of Noah And The Epic Of Gilgamesh

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Global floods have been a shared part of human culture and religion for thousands of years. There are countless stories of worldwide floods throughout the ages. A majority of the global flood stories share the same basic framework which consists of a hero, a means of salvation, and a blessing. The most popular flood accounts are the Biblical flood of Noah and the Babylonian “Epic of Gilgamesh”. There are many similarities between the Babylonian flood story and the Noachian flood accounts. There are various topics and ideas that are appear to be shared throughout both storylines, such as reason for the flood, a warning that the flood will happen, the use of birds, blessings, and an offering given. However, neither Christian’s scholars nor secular…show more content…
It was discovered on twelve tables called Chaldean Flood Tablets. Inscribed on the tablets recites a poem that was written in an ancient Sumerian language. The original Gilgamesh tablets date to about 650 B.C.E. However, there are newer tablets that date as far back to 2,000 B.C.E. According to the Institute for Creation Research, linguistics of the Epic of Gilgamesh could possibly date back as far as the third millennium B.C.E as oral tradition (Lorey). The Gilgamesh epic is also the most intact version of any of the Babylonian flood stories with 205 lines missing (Lorey). Since the Gilgamesh epic is the most intact, it is also the most studied narrative of any ancient Babylonian flood…show more content…
There was a god named Enlil, the god of the storm and wind, who found human nature annoying. Enlil decided that it was time for humans to be destroyed by a flood, and was able to persuade many of the other gods to agree ("The Epic of Gilgamesh"). However, there was one god who did not agree that the humans needed to be destroyed named Ea, the god of water. Ea came to Utnapishtim in a dream concerning a plan to kill all living things by a great flood, and that he needed to build a boat to save all life. Ea said to Utnapishtim that the boat need to be six stories, and each wall needed to be ten and twelve cubits square ("The Epic of Gilgamesh"). Utnapishtim was told to bring his family and all living species aboard the boat. Ea told Utnapishtim to tell the people that Enlil wanted to kill them. Also they would receive treasures of plenty as if it were a party ("The Epic of Gilgamesh"). After the ship was completed and all the passengers were aboard, the storm lasted seven days. To locate land Utnapishtim released three birds a dove, a swallow, and a raven. The ship landed on a mountain, Mount Nimush. Once Utnapishtim was able he made an offering, which pleased the gods. By the end of the flood Enlil made Utnapishtim and his wife like gods, they were granted immortally ("The Epic of
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