Comparing the Novel and Film Adaptation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

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Comparing the Novel and Film Adaptation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

“Horror and science fiction tend to present radically opposite interpretations of what may look like comparable situations.” (Kawin, 1981.) Bruce Kawin helps the reader to understand how a story in the genre of science fiction could be adapted, or bastardized if you like, into a horror. This is similar to the film adaptation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Both “Frankenstein” (1931) and “Bride of Frankenstein” (1935) portrayed characters and events differently than Shelley would have desired. Her novel had many deeper implications than the movie portrayed.

James Whale and the many adapters/screenwriters involved in both films leeched onto the inhumanity of the monster and the terror he could create. The monster could not speak at all in “Frankenstein” but did learn to speak poorly in “Bride of Frankenstein.” However, when he is finally given the ability to speak, the monster is portrayed as a shallow character that indulges on simple pleasures. “Smoke ...smoke,” and “Drink…good,” are a couple of the commen...
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