Compare Much Ado About Nothing, Pride And Prejudice And A Streetcar Named Desire

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“Love can often lead to the creation of an ‘Outsider’.” Say to what extent you agree with this statement by comparing and contrasting Much Ado About Nothing, Pride and Prejudice and A Streetcar Named Desire. When discussing the notion that “Love can often lead to the creation of an ‘Outsider’." there are cases in our literary examples that would agree with the statement, and some that would not. Outsiders in Much Ado About Nothing, Pride and Prejudice and A Streetcar Named Desire are created by both love and other themes, whether it be class, power, disinterest or a scandal. The above statement can be agreed with to some extent. This is predominantly present in A Streetcar Named Desire and Much Ado About Nothing. For one, at the beginning…show more content…
The loss of her beloved husband keeps Blanche’s mental state in the past, back when she was 16, when she only cared about her appearance. That is why at the age of 30 she avoids bright lights that reveal her wrinkles. Blanche does not want to remember the troubles of her past and therefore she attempts to remain at a time when life was simpler. This is reinforced by the light metaphor which illustrates how her life has darkened since Allan’s suicide and how the light of love will never shine as brightly for Blanche ever again. Although, throughout the play Blanche sparks an interest in Mitch, a friend of Stanley’s, who reveals in Scene three that he also lost a lover once, although his lover was taken by an illness, not suicide, and therefore he still searches for the possibility of love, when Blanche aims to find stability and security. Secondly, throughout Much Ado About Nothing Don John the bastard is considered an outsider. In Act 1, scene 3 Don John and his companion Conrade are having a discussion about Don John’s sadness. During this conversation Don John says: “and it better fits my blood to be disdained of all, than to fashion a carriage to rob love from

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